Comparison of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in Differentiating Recurrent Brain Neoplasm From Radiation Necrosis

William R. Masch, Page I. Wang, Thomas L. Chenevert, Larry Junck, Christina Tsien, Jason A. Heth, Pia C. Sundgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: To compare differences in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging characteristics of recurrent neoplasm and radiation necrosis in patients with brain tumors previously treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery and chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Patients with a history of brain neoplasm previously treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and surgery who developed a new enhancing lesion on posttreatment surveillance MRI were enrolled. DSC perfusion MRI and DTI were performed. Region of interest cursors were manually drawn in the contrast-enhancing lesions, in the perilesional white matter edema, and in the contralateral normal-appearing frontal lobe white matter. DTI and DSC perfusion MR indices were compared in recurrent tumor versus radiation necrosis. Results: Twenty-two patients with 24 lesions were included. Sixteen (67%) lesions were placed into the recurrent neoplasm group and eight (33%) lesions were placed into the radiation necrosis group using biopsy results as the gold standard in all but three patients. Mean apparent diffusion coefficient values, mean parallel eigenvalues, and mean perpendicular eigenvalues in the contrast-enhancing lesion were significantly lower, and relative cerebral blood volume was significantly higher for the recurrent neoplasm group compared to the radiation necrosis group (P < 0.01, P = 0.03, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). Conclusions: The combined assessment of DTI and DSC MR perfusion properties of new contrast-enhancing lesions is helpful in distinguishing recurrent neoplasm from radiation necrosis in patients with a history of brain neoplasm previously treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery and chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)569-576
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic radiology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain neoplasm
  • Brain tumor
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging
  • Radiation necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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