Comparison of cognitive functioning among individuals with treated restless legs syndrome (RLS), Untreated RLS, and No RLS

Hochang Benjamin Lee, Christine M. Ramsey, Adam P. Spira, Jacqueline Vachon, Richard Allen, Cynthia A. Munro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological sensory-motor condition. High prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety has been reported, but the few available data on the impact of RLS on cognition have been conflicting. The authors compared 91 participants (No-RLS group: N=37; Untreated RLS group: N=23; Treated RLS group: N=31) on cognitive performance and depression ratings. There were minimal observed group differences in cognitive performance, but the untreated RLS group had significantly higher depressive symptoms than the treated RLS and the no-RLS groups. RLS does not appear to affect cognition, but there does appear to be a strong association between untreated RLS and depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-91
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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