Comparison of chlamydia trachomatis serovars causing rectal and cervical infections

Robert C. Barnes, Anne Marie Rompalo, Walter E. Stamm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We used monoclonal antibodies capable of distinguishing serovars of Chlamydia trachomatis to compare 314 cervical isolates with 150 rectal isolates from homosexual men. The isolates were obtained from patients attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic over a two-year study period. The serovar distribution of cervical and rectal isolates differed significantly. Serovar D/D′ was found in 53% of the rectal isolates but in only 18% of cervical isolates (P `.0001). Serovar E was the predominant serovar in cervical isolates (32%) but was found in only 60% of rectal isolates (P `.0001). Serovars B, I/I′, H, and K were isolated from 2%–7% of cervical specimens but were not found in rectal isolates. There was a significant decline in the proportion of rectal infections caused by serovar D/D′ over the study period, and clustering of infections caused by other serovars was observed. Serotyping using monoclonal antibodies provides a powerful tool for investigating the epidemiology of sexually transmitted C. trachomatis infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-958
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume156
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Chlamydia trachomatis
Infection
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Monoclonal Antibodies
Serotyping
Serogroup
Cluster Analysis
Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Comparison of chlamydia trachomatis serovars causing rectal and cervical infections. / Barnes, Robert C.; Rompalo, Anne Marie; Stamm, Walter E.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 156, No. 6, 1987, p. 953-958.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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