Comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study compared the efficacy of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence. Method: Participants (N=164) were relatively treatment-naive, opioid-dependent applicants to a 26-week treatment program who were randomly assigned to either methadone or buprenorphine treatment. Dosing was double-blind and double-dummy. Patients were stabilized on a regimen of either methadone, 50 mg, or buprenorphine, 8 mg, with dose changes possible through week 16 of treatment. Urine samples were collected three times a week, and weekly counseling was provided. Results: Buprenorphine (mean dose=8.9 mg/day) and methadone (mean dose=54 mg/day) were equally effective in sustaining retention in treatment, compliance with medication, and counseling regimens. In both groups, 56% of patients remained in treatment through the 16-week flexible dosing period. Overall opioid-positive urine sample rates were 55% and 47% for buprenorphine and methadone groups, respectively; cocaine-positive urine sample rates were 70% and 58%. Evidence was obtained for the effectiveness of dose increases in suppressing opioid, but not cocaine, use among those who received dose increases. Conclusions: The results of this study provide further support for the utility of buprenorphine as a new medication in the treatment of opioid dependence and demonstrate efficacy equivalent to that of methadone when used during a clinically guided flexible dosing procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1025-1030
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume151
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1994

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Buprenorphine
Methadone
Opioid Analgesics
Urine
Therapeutics
Cocaine
Counseling
Medication Adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence. / Strain, Eric C; Stitzer, Maxine L; Liebson, Ira A.; Bigelow, George.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 151, No. 7, 07.1994, p. 1025-1030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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