Comparison of bedside and hospital laboratory coagulation studies during and after coronary intervention

Roger S Blumenthal, A. J. Carter, Jon R Resar, V. Coombs, S. T. Gloth, J. Dalal, Jeffrey A Brinker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The activated clotting time is routinely used to monitor anticoagulation during coronary intervention, whereas the hospital laboratory APTT guides pre- and postprocedure heparin therapy. An optimal coagulation test for patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization would provide a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout a broad range of heparin therapy. We studied the relationships of the bedside whole blood APTT, ACT, and the laboratory APTT in 166 patients undergoing coronary intervation. The whole blood APTT correlated closely with the laboratory APTT (range 18-80 sec) (r = .75), whereas the ACT and laboratory APTT had only a fair correlation (r = .42). Also, the whole blood APTT demonstrated a strong correlation with the ACT throughout the range of heparin therapy for intervention (r = .81). The diagnostic accuracy of the whole blood APTT, based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, was significantly better than that for the ACT in determining the anticoagulation status. The whole blood APTT obtained by bedside monitoring provides a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout the range of heparin dosing associated with coronary intervention. In situations in which an adequate assessment of residual anticoagulation is necessary, the whole blood APTT is superior to the ACT and probably should be the method of choice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-17
Number of pages9
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis
Volume35
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Hospital Laboratories
Heparin
ROC Curve
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • coagulation
  • heparin
  • PTCA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Comparison of bedside and hospital laboratory coagulation studies during and after coronary intervention. / Blumenthal, Roger S; Carter, A. J.; Resar, Jon R; Coombs, V.; Gloth, S. T.; Dalal, J.; Brinker, Jeffrey A.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis, Vol. 35, No. 1, 1995, p. 9-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{81bda14c01584cb08423567def679cd1,
title = "Comparison of bedside and hospital laboratory coagulation studies during and after coronary intervention",
abstract = "The activated clotting time is routinely used to monitor anticoagulation during coronary intervention, whereas the hospital laboratory APTT guides pre- and postprocedure heparin therapy. An optimal coagulation test for patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization would provide a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout a broad range of heparin therapy. We studied the relationships of the bedside whole blood APTT, ACT, and the laboratory APTT in 166 patients undergoing coronary intervation. The whole blood APTT correlated closely with the laboratory APTT (range 18-80 sec) (r = .75), whereas the ACT and laboratory APTT had only a fair correlation (r = .42). Also, the whole blood APTT demonstrated a strong correlation with the ACT throughout the range of heparin therapy for intervention (r = .81). The diagnostic accuracy of the whole blood APTT, based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, was significantly better than that for the ACT in determining the anticoagulation status. The whole blood APTT obtained by bedside monitoring provides a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout the range of heparin dosing associated with coronary intervention. In situations in which an adequate assessment of residual anticoagulation is necessary, the whole blood APTT is superior to the ACT and probably should be the method of choice.",
keywords = "coagulation, heparin, PTCA",
author = "Blumenthal, {Roger S} and Carter, {A. J.} and Resar, {Jon R} and V. Coombs and Gloth, {S. T.} and J. Dalal and Brinker, {Jeffrey A}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "9--17",
journal = "Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions",
issn = "1522-1946",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of bedside and hospital laboratory coagulation studies during and after coronary intervention

AU - Blumenthal, Roger S

AU - Carter, A. J.

AU - Resar, Jon R

AU - Coombs, V.

AU - Gloth, S. T.

AU - Dalal, J.

AU - Brinker, Jeffrey A

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - The activated clotting time is routinely used to monitor anticoagulation during coronary intervention, whereas the hospital laboratory APTT guides pre- and postprocedure heparin therapy. An optimal coagulation test for patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization would provide a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout a broad range of heparin therapy. We studied the relationships of the bedside whole blood APTT, ACT, and the laboratory APTT in 166 patients undergoing coronary intervation. The whole blood APTT correlated closely with the laboratory APTT (range 18-80 sec) (r = .75), whereas the ACT and laboratory APTT had only a fair correlation (r = .42). Also, the whole blood APTT demonstrated a strong correlation with the ACT throughout the range of heparin therapy for intervention (r = .81). The diagnostic accuracy of the whole blood APTT, based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, was significantly better than that for the ACT in determining the anticoagulation status. The whole blood APTT obtained by bedside monitoring provides a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout the range of heparin dosing associated with coronary intervention. In situations in which an adequate assessment of residual anticoagulation is necessary, the whole blood APTT is superior to the ACT and probably should be the method of choice.

AB - The activated clotting time is routinely used to monitor anticoagulation during coronary intervention, whereas the hospital laboratory APTT guides pre- and postprocedure heparin therapy. An optimal coagulation test for patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization would provide a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout a broad range of heparin therapy. We studied the relationships of the bedside whole blood APTT, ACT, and the laboratory APTT in 166 patients undergoing coronary intervation. The whole blood APTT correlated closely with the laboratory APTT (range 18-80 sec) (r = .75), whereas the ACT and laboratory APTT had only a fair correlation (r = .42). Also, the whole blood APTT demonstrated a strong correlation with the ACT throughout the range of heparin therapy for intervention (r = .81). The diagnostic accuracy of the whole blood APTT, based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, was significantly better than that for the ACT in determining the anticoagulation status. The whole blood APTT obtained by bedside monitoring provides a rapid and accurate assessment of anticoagulation throughout the range of heparin dosing associated with coronary intervention. In situations in which an adequate assessment of residual anticoagulation is necessary, the whole blood APTT is superior to the ACT and probably should be the method of choice.

KW - coagulation

KW - heparin

KW - PTCA

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029033502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029033502&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7614548

AN - SCOPUS:0029033502

VL - 35

SP - 9

EP - 17

JO - Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions

JF - Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions

SN - 1522-1946

IS - 1

ER -