Comparison of anthropometric indicators to predict mortality in a population-based prospective study of children under 5 years in Niger

Kieran S. O'Brien, Abdou Amza, Boubacar Kadri, Beido Nassirou, Sun Y. Cotter, Nicole E. Stoller, Sheila K. West, Robin L. Bailey, Travis C. Porco, Jeremy D. Keenan, Thomas M. Lietman, Catherine E. Oldenburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: In the present study, we aimed to compare anthropometric indicators as predictors of mortality in a community-based setting.Design: We conducted a population-based longitudinal study nested in a cluster-randomized trial. We assessed weight, height and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) on children 12 months after the trial began and used the trial's annual census and monitoring visits to assess mortality over 2 years.Setting: Niger.Participants: Children aged 6-60 months during the study.Results: Of 1023 children included in the study at baseline, height-for-age Z-score, weight-for-age Z-score, weight-for-height Z-score and MUAC classified 777 (76·0 %), 630 (61·6 %), 131 (12·9 %) and eighty (7·8 %) children as moderately to severely malnourished, respectively. Over the 2-year study period, fifty-eight children (5·7 %) died. MUAC had the greatest AUC (0·68, 95 % CI 0·61, 0·75) and had the strongest association with mortality in this sample (hazard ratio = 2·21, 95 % CI 1·26, 3·89, P = 0·006).Conclusions: MUAC appears to be a better predictor of mortality than other anthropometric indicators in this community-based, high-malnutrition setting in Niger.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)538-543
Number of pages6
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Malnutrition
  • Mortality
  • Niger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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