Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: Adverse reactions

M. D. Decker, K. M. Edwards, M. C. Steinhoff, M. B. Rennels, M. E. Pichichero, J. A. Englund, E. L. Anderson, Maria Deloria Knoll, G. F. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To compare the reactogenicity of a licensed conventional whole- cell (WCL) and 13 acellular pertussis vaccines that differed in the source, manufacture, and quantity of included antigens; all vaccines included diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. Methods. Healthy infants were enrolled through six university-based vaccine and treatment evaluation units and were randomized to receive one of the study vaccines at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. Parents recorded the occurrence of fever, redness, swelling, pain, fussiness, drowsiness, anorexia, and use of antipyretics for 2 weeks after each inoculation; nurses interviewed parents on the third day and at each succeeding visit; long-term follow-up information was collected from parents and medical records 1 year after the third immunization. Results. Of 2200 vaccinated infants, 2189 contributed reaction data after 6375 vaccinations. For every acellular vaccine, every monitored reaction except vomiting occurred at a significantly lower frequency and severity than was seen with WCL. The groups receiving acellular pertussis vaccines differed significantly with respect to redness, swelling, pain, and vomiting, but not with respect to fussiness, antipyretic use, drowsiness, or anorexia. Conclusion. Although there were differences among the acellular vaccines, none was consistently the most or least reactogenic; all were associated with substantially fewer and less severe adverse reactions than a standard commercial whole-cell vaccine. Selection of acellular vaccines for further development and for introduction into efficacy and purity, with comparative reactogenicity a secondary consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-566
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics
Volume96
Issue number3 II SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acellular Vaccines
Pertussis Vaccine
Antipyretics
Vaccines
Sleep Stages
Parents
Anorexia
Vomiting
Diphtheria Toxoid
Pain
Tetanus Toxoid
Medical Records
Immunization
Vaccination
Fever
Nurses
Antigens

Keywords

  • acellular
  • adverse reactions
  • diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine
  • pertussis vaccine
  • whole cell
  • whooping cough

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Decker, M. D., Edwards, K. M., Steinhoff, M. C., Rennels, M. B., Pichichero, M. E., Englund, J. A., ... Reed, G. F. (1995). Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: Adverse reactions. Pediatrics, 96(3 II SUPPL.), 557-566.

Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines : Adverse reactions. / Decker, M. D.; Edwards, K. M.; Steinhoff, M. C.; Rennels, M. B.; Pichichero, M. E.; Englund, J. A.; Anderson, E. L.; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Reed, G. F.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 96, No. 3 II SUPPL., 1995, p. 557-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Decker, MD, Edwards, KM, Steinhoff, MC, Rennels, MB, Pichichero, ME, Englund, JA, Anderson, EL, Knoll, MD & Reed, GF 1995, 'Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: Adverse reactions', Pediatrics, vol. 96, no. 3 II SUPPL., pp. 557-566.
Decker MD, Edwards KM, Steinhoff MC, Rennels MB, Pichichero ME, Englund JA et al. Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines: Adverse reactions. Pediatrics. 1995;96(3 II SUPPL.):557-566.
Decker, M. D. ; Edwards, K. M. ; Steinhoff, M. C. ; Rennels, M. B. ; Pichichero, M. E. ; Englund, J. A. ; Anderson, E. L. ; Knoll, Maria Deloria ; Reed, G. F. / Comparison of 13 acellular pertussis vaccines : Adverse reactions. In: Pediatrics. 1995 ; Vol. 96, No. 3 II SUPPL. pp. 557-566.
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