Comparer les taux de mortalité routière selon les données déclarées par la police et selon les données d'enregistrement des décès en Chine

Translated title of the contribution: Comparing road traffic mortality rates from police-reported data and death registration data in China

Guoqing Hu, Timothy Baker, Susan P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To compare death rates from road traffic injuries in China in 2002-2007 when derived from police-reported data versus death registration data. Methods In China, police-recorded data are obtained from police records by means of a standardized, closed-ended data collection form; these data are published in the China statistical yearbook of communication and transportation. Official death registration data, on the other hand, are obtained from death certificates completed by physicians and are published in the China health statistics yearbook. We searched both sources for data on road traffic deaths in 2002-2007, used the χ2 test to compare the mortality rates obtained, and performed linear regression to look for statistically significant trends in road traffic mortality over the period. Findings For 2002-2007, the rate of death from road traffic injuries based on death registration data was about twice as high as the rate reported by the police. Linear regression showed a significant decrease of 27% (95% confidence interval, CI: 35-19) in the death rate over the period according to police sources but no significant change according to death registration data. Conclusion The widely-cited recent drop in road traffic mortality in China, based on police-reported data, may not reflect a genuine decrease. The quality of the data obtained from police reports, which drives decision-making by the Government of China and international organizations, needs to be investigated, monitored and improved.

Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)41-45
Number of pages5
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Police
China
Mortality
Linear Models
Death Certificates
Information Storage and Retrieval
Wounds and Injuries
Decision Making
Communication
Organizations
Confidence Intervals
Physicians
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Comparer les taux de mortalité routière selon les données déclarées par la police et selon les données d'enregistrement des décès en Chine. / Hu, Guoqing; Baker, Timothy; Baker, Susan P.

In: Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 89, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 41-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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