Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians: A scoping review

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objective: Acutely ill infants and children presenting to the emergency department are treated by either physicians with pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) training or physicians without PEM training, a good proportion of which are general emergency medicine-trained physicians (GEDPs). This scoping review identified published literature comparing the care provided to infants and children (≤21 years of age) by PEMtrained physicians to that provided by GEDPs. Methods: The search was conducted in 2main steps as follows: (1) initial literature search to identify available literature with evolving feedback from the group while simultaneously deciding search concepts as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria and (2)modification of search concepts and conduction of search using finalized concepts as well as review and selection of articles for final analysis using set inclusion criteria. Each study was independently assessed by 2 reviewers for eligibility and quality. Datawere independently abstracted by reviewers, and authors were contacted for missing data. Results: Our search yielded 3137 titles and abstracts. Twenty articles reporting 19 studies were included in the final analysis. The studies were grouped under type of care, diagnostic studies, medication administration, and process of care. The studies addressed differences in the management of fever, croup, bronchiolitis, asthma, urticaria, febrile seizures, and diabetic ketoacidosis. Conclusions: This review highlights the lack of robust studies and heterogeneity of literature comparing practice patterns of PEM-trained physicians with GEDPs.We have outlined a systematic approach to reviewing a body of literature for topics that lack clear terms of comparison across studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-286
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Physicians
Emergency Medicine
Croup
Febrile Seizures
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Bronchiolitis
Urticaria
Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Hospital Emergency Service
Fever
Asthma

Keywords

  • Pediatric emergency practice guidelines
  • Pediatric guidelines
  • Physician's practice patterns
  • Practice guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators (2017). Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians: A scoping review. Pediatric Emergency Care, 33(4), 278-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000000557

Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians : A scoping review. / International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators.

In: Pediatric Emergency Care, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2017, p. 278-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators 2017, 'Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians: A scoping review', Pediatric Emergency Care, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 278-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000000557
International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators. Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians: A scoping review. Pediatric Emergency Care. 2017;33(4):278-286. https://doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000000557
International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, and Education (INSPIRE) IMPACTS Investigators. / Comparing practice patterns between pediatric and general emergency medicine physicians : A scoping review. In: Pediatric Emergency Care. 2017 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 278-286.
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