Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians

Gary L. Freed, Linda Althouse, William Balistreri, Thomas Boat, Russell Chesney, Gary Freed, Hazen Ham, George Lister, Gail McGuinness, Julia McMillan, Paul Miles, Jean Robillard, James Stockman, Michelle Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to compare the perceptions of clinical preparedness among graduates of categorical pediatric and internal medicine residency programs versus medicine-pediatric training programs and whether these varied for recent or older graduates. METHODS. A mail survey study was conducted in the fall of 2004 of a random sample of 245 and 246 internal medicine physicians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates), respectively, and a random sample of 248 and 247 pediatricians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates). Analyses compared results from a recent, similar survey of medicine-pediatric physicians. RESULTS. Response rate for pediatricians was 78% and for internal medicine physicians was 64%. Categorically trained pediatricians were more likely than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians to report that they were very well prepared to care for infants (65% vs 50%) but less likely well trained to care for adolescents (17% vs 45%). Categorically trained internal medicine residents were less likely to feel very well prepared to care for both adults and elders than their medicine-pediatrics-trained counterparts. CONCLUSIONS. Categorically trained pediatricians and internal medicine physicians believed that they were no better prepared to care for their patients than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians. Regardless of their beliefs of their preparedness, medicine-pediatrics physicians in practice spend a significant majority of their time in the care of adults rather than children. Our findings indicate that this is not because of their perception of a lack of training or preparation in the care of children relative to categorically trained pediatricians. Other factors, including but not limited to patient demographic changes, reimbursement for care, and the job market, potentially play a significant role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1108
Number of pages5
JournalPediatrics
Volume118
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Medicine
Pediatrics
Physicians
Infant Care
Postal Service
Internship and Residency
Child Care
Patient Care
Demography
Pediatricians
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Internal medicine
  • Medicine-pediatrics
  • Pediatrics
  • Residency
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Freed, G. L., Althouse, L., Balistreri, W., Boat, T., Chesney, R., Freed, G., ... Wall, M. (2006). Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians. Pediatrics, 118(3), 1104-1108. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-0042

Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians. / Freed, Gary L.; Althouse, Linda; Balistreri, William; Boat, Thomas; Chesney, Russell; Freed, Gary; Ham, Hazen; Lister, George; McGuinness, Gail; McMillan, Julia; Miles, Paul; Robillard, Jean; Stockman, James; Wall, Michelle.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 118, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 1104-1108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freed, GL, Althouse, L, Balistreri, W, Boat, T, Chesney, R, Freed, G, Ham, H, Lister, G, McGuinness, G, McMillan, J, Miles, P, Robillard, J, Stockman, J & Wall, M 2006, 'Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians', Pediatrics, vol. 118, no. 3, pp. 1104-1108. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-0042
Freed GL, Althouse L, Balistreri W, Boat T, Chesney R, Freed G et al. Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians. Pediatrics. 2006 Sep;118(3):1104-1108. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-0042
Freed, Gary L. ; Althouse, Linda ; Balistreri, William ; Boat, Thomas ; Chesney, Russell ; Freed, Gary ; Ham, Hazen ; Lister, George ; McGuinness, Gail ; McMillan, Julia ; Miles, Paul ; Robillard, Jean ; Stockman, James ; Wall, Michelle. / Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians. In: Pediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 118, No. 3. pp. 1104-1108.
@article{acb5e0fe222040c9bf05f05531f0430c,
title = "Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to compare the perceptions of clinical preparedness among graduates of categorical pediatric and internal medicine residency programs versus medicine-pediatric training programs and whether these varied for recent or older graduates. METHODS. A mail survey study was conducted in the fall of 2004 of a random sample of 245 and 246 internal medicine physicians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates), respectively, and a random sample of 248 and 247 pediatricians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates). Analyses compared results from a recent, similar survey of medicine-pediatric physicians. RESULTS. Response rate for pediatricians was 78{\%} and for internal medicine physicians was 64{\%}. Categorically trained pediatricians were more likely than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians to report that they were very well prepared to care for infants (65{\%} vs 50{\%}) but less likely well trained to care for adolescents (17{\%} vs 45{\%}). Categorically trained internal medicine residents were less likely to feel very well prepared to care for both adults and elders than their medicine-pediatrics-trained counterparts. CONCLUSIONS. Categorically trained pediatricians and internal medicine physicians believed that they were no better prepared to care for their patients than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians. Regardless of their beliefs of their preparedness, medicine-pediatrics physicians in practice spend a significant majority of their time in the care of adults rather than children. Our findings indicate that this is not because of their perception of a lack of training or preparation in the care of children relative to categorically trained pediatricians. Other factors, including but not limited to patient demographic changes, reimbursement for care, and the job market, potentially play a significant role.",
keywords = "Internal medicine, Medicine-pediatrics, Pediatrics, Residency, Training",
author = "Freed, {Gary L.} and Linda Althouse and William Balistreri and Thomas Boat and Russell Chesney and Gary Freed and Hazen Ham and George Lister and Gail McGuinness and Julia McMillan and Paul Miles and Jean Robillard and James Stockman and Michelle Wall",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2006-0042",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "1104--1108",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing perceptions of training for medicine-pediatrics and categorically trained physicians

AU - Freed, Gary L.

AU - Althouse, Linda

AU - Balistreri, William

AU - Boat, Thomas

AU - Chesney, Russell

AU - Freed, Gary

AU - Ham, Hazen

AU - Lister, George

AU - McGuinness, Gail

AU - McMillan, Julia

AU - Miles, Paul

AU - Robillard, Jean

AU - Stockman, James

AU - Wall, Michelle

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to compare the perceptions of clinical preparedness among graduates of categorical pediatric and internal medicine residency programs versus medicine-pediatric training programs and whether these varied for recent or older graduates. METHODS. A mail survey study was conducted in the fall of 2004 of a random sample of 245 and 246 internal medicine physicians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates), respectively, and a random sample of 248 and 247 pediatricians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates). Analyses compared results from a recent, similar survey of medicine-pediatric physicians. RESULTS. Response rate for pediatricians was 78% and for internal medicine physicians was 64%. Categorically trained pediatricians were more likely than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians to report that they were very well prepared to care for infants (65% vs 50%) but less likely well trained to care for adolescents (17% vs 45%). Categorically trained internal medicine residents were less likely to feel very well prepared to care for both adults and elders than their medicine-pediatrics-trained counterparts. CONCLUSIONS. Categorically trained pediatricians and internal medicine physicians believed that they were no better prepared to care for their patients than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians. Regardless of their beliefs of their preparedness, medicine-pediatrics physicians in practice spend a significant majority of their time in the care of adults rather than children. Our findings indicate that this is not because of their perception of a lack of training or preparation in the care of children relative to categorically trained pediatricians. Other factors, including but not limited to patient demographic changes, reimbursement for care, and the job market, potentially play a significant role.

AB - OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to compare the perceptions of clinical preparedness among graduates of categorical pediatric and internal medicine residency programs versus medicine-pediatric training programs and whether these varied for recent or older graduates. METHODS. A mail survey study was conducted in the fall of 2004 of a random sample of 245 and 246 internal medicine physicians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates), respectively, and a random sample of 248 and 247 pediatricians who applied for or took a general certifying examination between 1980 and 1997 (older graduates) and between 1998 and 2003 (recent graduates). Analyses compared results from a recent, similar survey of medicine-pediatric physicians. RESULTS. Response rate for pediatricians was 78% and for internal medicine physicians was 64%. Categorically trained pediatricians were more likely than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians to report that they were very well prepared to care for infants (65% vs 50%) but less likely well trained to care for adolescents (17% vs 45%). Categorically trained internal medicine residents were less likely to feel very well prepared to care for both adults and elders than their medicine-pediatrics-trained counterparts. CONCLUSIONS. Categorically trained pediatricians and internal medicine physicians believed that they were no better prepared to care for their patients than medicine-pediatrics-trained physicians. Regardless of their beliefs of their preparedness, medicine-pediatrics physicians in practice spend a significant majority of their time in the care of adults rather than children. Our findings indicate that this is not because of their perception of a lack of training or preparation in the care of children relative to categorically trained pediatricians. Other factors, including but not limited to patient demographic changes, reimbursement for care, and the job market, potentially play a significant role.

KW - Internal medicine

KW - Medicine-pediatrics

KW - Pediatrics

KW - Residency

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749073884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749073884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2006-0042

DO - 10.1542/peds.2006-0042

M3 - Article

C2 - 16951004

AN - SCOPUS:33749073884

VL - 118

SP - 1104

EP - 1108

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 3

ER -