Comparing barriers to mental health treatment and substance use disorder treatment among individuals with comorbid major depression and substance use disorders

Ramin Mojtabai, Lian Yu Chen, Christopher N. Kaufmann, Rosa M. Crum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Barriers to both mental health and substance use disorder treatments have rarely been examined among individuals with comorbid mental health and substance use disorders. In a sample of 393 adults with 12-month major depressive episodes and substance use disorders, we compared perceived barriers to these two types of treatments. Data were drawn from the 2005-2011 US National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Overall, the same individuals experienced different barriers to mental health treatment versus substance use disorder treatment. Concerns about negative views of the community, effects on job, and inconvenience of services were more commonly reported as reasons for not receiving substance use disorder treatment. Not affording the cost of care was the most common barrier to both types of treatments, but more commonly reported as a barrier to mental health treatment. Improved financial access through the Affordable Care Act and parity legislation and integration of mental health and substance use disorder services may help to reduce treatment barriers among individuals with comorbid mental health and substance disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-273
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Barriers to care
  • Comorbidity
  • Mental health services
  • Service use
  • Substance disorder services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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