Comparative genomic hybridisation as a supportive tool in diagnostic pathology

M. M. Weiss, E. J. Kuipers, S. G M Meuwissen, P. J. Van Diest, G. A. Meijer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: Patients with multiple tumour localisations pose a particular problem to the pathologist when the traditional combination of clinical data, morphology, and immunohistochemistry does not provide conclusive evidence to differentiate between metastasis or second primary, or does not identify the primary location in cases of metastases and two primary tumours. Because this is crucial to decide on further treatment, molecular techniques are increasingly being used as ancillary tools. Methods: The value of comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) to differentiate between metastasis and second primary, or to identify the primary location in cases of metastases and two primary tumours was studied in seven patients. CGH is a cytogenetic technique that allows the analysis of genome wide amplifications, gains, and losses (deletions) in a tumour within a single experiment. The patterns of these chromosomal aberrations at the different tumour localisations were compared. Results: In all seven cases, CGH patterns of gains and losses supported the differentiation between metastasis and second primary, or the identification of the primary location in cases of metastases and two primary tumours. Conclusion: The results illustrate the diagnostic value of CGH in patients with multiple tumours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-527
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume56
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Pathology
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms
Cytogenetic Analysis
Chromosome Aberrations
Immunohistochemistry
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Weiss, M. M., Kuipers, E. J., Meuwissen, S. G. M., Van Diest, P. J., & Meijer, G. A. (2003). Comparative genomic hybridisation as a supportive tool in diagnostic pathology. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 56(7), 522-527. https://doi.org/10.1136/jcp.56.7.522

Comparative genomic hybridisation as a supportive tool in diagnostic pathology. / Weiss, M. M.; Kuipers, E. J.; Meuwissen, S. G M; Van Diest, P. J.; Meijer, G. A.

In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 56, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 522-527.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiss, MM, Kuipers, EJ, Meuwissen, SGM, Van Diest, PJ & Meijer, GA 2003, 'Comparative genomic hybridisation as a supportive tool in diagnostic pathology', Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 56, no. 7, pp. 522-527. https://doi.org/10.1136/jcp.56.7.522
Weiss, M. M. ; Kuipers, E. J. ; Meuwissen, S. G M ; Van Diest, P. J. ; Meijer, G. A. / Comparative genomic hybridisation as a supportive tool in diagnostic pathology. In: Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2003 ; Vol. 56, No. 7. pp. 522-527.
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