Comparative cost of stockpiling various types of respiratory protective devices to protect the health care workforce during an influenza pandemic

Gio Baracco, Sheri Eisert, Aaron Eagan, Lewis Radonovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Specific guidance on the size and composition of respiratory protective device (RPD) stockpiles for use during a pandemic is lacking. We explore the economic aspects of stockpiling various types and combinations of RPDs by adapting a pandemic model that estimates the impact of a severe pandemic on a defined population, the number of potential interactions between patients and health care personnel, and the potential number of health care personnel needed to fulfill those needs. Our model calculates the number of the different types of RPDs that should be stockpiled and the consequent cost of purchase and storage, prorating this cost over the shelf life of the inventory. Compared with disposable N95 or powered air-purifying respirators, we show that stockpiling reusable elastomeric half-face respirators is the least costly approach. Disposable N95 respirators take up significantly more storage space, which increases relative costs. Reusing or extending the usable period of disposable devices may diminish some of these costs. We conclude that stockpiling a combination of disposable N95 and reusable half-face RPDs is the best approach to preparedness for most health care organizations. We recommend against stockpiling powered air-purifying respirators as they are much more costly than alternative approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-318
Number of pages6
JournalDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 17 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Respiratory Protective Devices
Health Manpower
Pandemics
Human Influenza
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mechanical Ventilators
Health Personnel
Equipment and Supplies
Patient Care
Economics
Organizations
Population

Keywords

  • model
  • pandemics
  • respiratory protective devices
  • stockpiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Comparative cost of stockpiling various types of respiratory protective devices to protect the health care workforce during an influenza pandemic. / Baracco, Gio; Eisert, Sheri; Eagan, Aaron; Radonovich, Lewis.

In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, Vol. 9, No. 3, 17.03.2015, p. 313-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{521b1d6d07034229842f83d7485f2cfe,
title = "Comparative cost of stockpiling various types of respiratory protective devices to protect the health care workforce during an influenza pandemic",
abstract = "Specific guidance on the size and composition of respiratory protective device (RPD) stockpiles for use during a pandemic is lacking. We explore the economic aspects of stockpiling various types and combinations of RPDs by adapting a pandemic model that estimates the impact of a severe pandemic on a defined population, the number of potential interactions between patients and health care personnel, and the potential number of health care personnel needed to fulfill those needs. Our model calculates the number of the different types of RPDs that should be stockpiled and the consequent cost of purchase and storage, prorating this cost over the shelf life of the inventory. Compared with disposable N95 or powered air-purifying respirators, we show that stockpiling reusable elastomeric half-face respirators is the least costly approach. Disposable N95 respirators take up significantly more storage space, which increases relative costs. Reusing or extending the usable period of disposable devices may diminish some of these costs. We conclude that stockpiling a combination of disposable N95 and reusable half-face RPDs is the best approach to preparedness for most health care organizations. We recommend against stockpiling powered air-purifying respirators as they are much more costly than alternative approaches.",
keywords = "model, pandemics, respiratory protective devices, stockpiles",
author = "Gio Baracco and Sheri Eisert and Aaron Eagan and Lewis Radonovich",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1017/dmp.2015.12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "313--318",
journal = "Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness",
issn = "1935-7893",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparative cost of stockpiling various types of respiratory protective devices to protect the health care workforce during an influenza pandemic

AU - Baracco, Gio

AU - Eisert, Sheri

AU - Eagan, Aaron

AU - Radonovich, Lewis

PY - 2015/3/17

Y1 - 2015/3/17

N2 - Specific guidance on the size and composition of respiratory protective device (RPD) stockpiles for use during a pandemic is lacking. We explore the economic aspects of stockpiling various types and combinations of RPDs by adapting a pandemic model that estimates the impact of a severe pandemic on a defined population, the number of potential interactions between patients and health care personnel, and the potential number of health care personnel needed to fulfill those needs. Our model calculates the number of the different types of RPDs that should be stockpiled and the consequent cost of purchase and storage, prorating this cost over the shelf life of the inventory. Compared with disposable N95 or powered air-purifying respirators, we show that stockpiling reusable elastomeric half-face respirators is the least costly approach. Disposable N95 respirators take up significantly more storage space, which increases relative costs. Reusing or extending the usable period of disposable devices may diminish some of these costs. We conclude that stockpiling a combination of disposable N95 and reusable half-face RPDs is the best approach to preparedness for most health care organizations. We recommend against stockpiling powered air-purifying respirators as they are much more costly than alternative approaches.

AB - Specific guidance on the size and composition of respiratory protective device (RPD) stockpiles for use during a pandemic is lacking. We explore the economic aspects of stockpiling various types and combinations of RPDs by adapting a pandemic model that estimates the impact of a severe pandemic on a defined population, the number of potential interactions between patients and health care personnel, and the potential number of health care personnel needed to fulfill those needs. Our model calculates the number of the different types of RPDs that should be stockpiled and the consequent cost of purchase and storage, prorating this cost over the shelf life of the inventory. Compared with disposable N95 or powered air-purifying respirators, we show that stockpiling reusable elastomeric half-face respirators is the least costly approach. Disposable N95 respirators take up significantly more storage space, which increases relative costs. Reusing or extending the usable period of disposable devices may diminish some of these costs. We conclude that stockpiling a combination of disposable N95 and reusable half-face RPDs is the best approach to preparedness for most health care organizations. We recommend against stockpiling powered air-purifying respirators as they are much more costly than alternative approaches.

KW - model

KW - pandemics

KW - respiratory protective devices

KW - stockpiles

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84931566001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84931566001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/dmp.2015.12

DO - 10.1017/dmp.2015.12

M3 - Article

C2 - 25874891

AN - SCOPUS:84931566001

VL - 9

SP - 313

EP - 318

JO - Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness

JF - Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness

SN - 1935-7893

IS - 3

ER -