Comparability of self-collected vaginal swabs and physician-collected cervical swabs for detection of human papillomavirus infections in Rakai, Uganda

Mahboobeh Safaeian, Mohammed Kiddugavu, Patti E. Gravitt, Joseph Ssekasanvu, Dan Murokora, Marc Sklar, David Serwadda, Maria J. Wawer, Keerti V. Shah, Ron Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing between self-administered vaginal swabs and physician-administered cervical swabs in women from rural Rakai District, Uganda. STUDY DESIGN: Between 2002 and 2003, women from a population-based cohort participated in an HPV study. Women collected self-administered vaginal swabs and were also offered a pelvic examination, which included physician-collected cervical samples. METHODS: Hybrid-capture 2 was used to determine carcinogenic HPV status. Polymerase chain reaction was used to determine HPV genotypes. Unweighted κ statistics were used to determine agreement. RESULTS: Compliance with self-collected swabs was ≥86%; however, only 51% accepted a pelvic examination. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence was 19% in self-collected and 19% in physician-collected samples. Agreement among paired observations was 92% with a κ of 0.75. Kappa between self- and physician-collected samples was similar in HIV strata (k = 0.71 and 0.75 for HIV-positive and HIV-negative, respectively). DISCUSSION: In this community-based setting, detection of carcinogenic HPV was comparable among self- and physician-administered samples. Self-collection is a feasible and accurate means of obtaining HPV samples from women in resource-poor settings or persons reluctant to undergo a pelvic examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-436
Number of pages8
JournalSexually transmitted diseases
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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