Comparability of self-collected vaginal swabs and physician-collected cervical swabs for detection of human papillomavirus infections in Rakai, Uganda

Mahboobeh Safaeian, Mohammed Kiddugavu, Patti E. Gravitt, Joseph Ssekasanvu, Dan Murokora, Marc Sklar, David Serwadda, Maria J Wawer, Keerti V. Shah, Ronald H Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing between self-administered vaginal swabs and physician-administered cervical swabs in women from rural Rakai District, Uganda. STUDY DESIGN: Between 2002 and 2003, women from a population-based cohort participated in an HPV study. Women collected self-administered vaginal swabs and were also offered a pelvic examination, which included physician-collected cervical samples. METHODS: Hybrid-capture 2 was used to determine carcinogenic HPV status. Polymerase chain reaction was used to determine HPV genotypes. Unweighted κ statistics were used to determine agreement. RESULTS: Compliance with self-collected swabs was ≥86%; however, only 51% accepted a pelvic examination. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence was 19% in self-collected and 19% in physician-collected samples. Agreement among paired observations was 92% with a κ of 0.75. Kappa between self- and physician-collected samples was similar in HIV strata (k = 0.71 and 0.75 for HIV-positive and HIV-negative, respectively). DISCUSSION: In this community-based setting, detection of carcinogenic HPV was comparable among self- and physician-administered samples. Self-collection is a feasible and accurate means of obtaining HPV samples from women in resource-poor settings or persons reluctant to undergo a pelvic examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-436
Number of pages8
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Uganda
Papillomavirus Infections
Physicians
Gynecological Examination
HIV
Genotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

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Comparability of self-collected vaginal swabs and physician-collected cervical swabs for detection of human papillomavirus infections in Rakai, Uganda. / Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kiddugavu, Mohammed; Gravitt, Patti E.; Ssekasanvu, Joseph; Murokora, Dan; Sklar, Marc; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J; Shah, Keerti V.; Gray, Ronald H.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 34, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 429-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safaeian, Mahboobeh ; Kiddugavu, Mohammed ; Gravitt, Patti E. ; Ssekasanvu, Joseph ; Murokora, Dan ; Sklar, Marc ; Serwadda, David ; Wawer, Maria J ; Shah, Keerti V. ; Gray, Ronald H. / Comparability of self-collected vaginal swabs and physician-collected cervical swabs for detection of human papillomavirus infections in Rakai, Uganda. In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases. 2007 ; Vol. 34, No. 7. pp. 429-436.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing between self-administered vaginal swabs and physician-administered cervical swabs in women from rural Rakai District, Uganda. STUDY DESIGN: Between 2002 and 2003, women from a population-based cohort participated in an HPV study. Women collected self-administered vaginal swabs and were also offered a pelvic examination, which included physician-collected cervical samples. METHODS: Hybrid-capture 2 was used to determine carcinogenic HPV status. Polymerase chain reaction was used to determine HPV genotypes. Unweighted κ statistics were used to determine agreement. RESULTS: Compliance with self-collected swabs was ≥86{\%}; however, only 51{\%} accepted a pelvic examination. Carcinogenic HPV prevalence was 19{\%} in self-collected and 19{\%} in physician-collected samples. Agreement among paired observations was 92{\%} with a κ of 0.75. Kappa between self- and physician-collected samples was similar in HIV strata (k = 0.71 and 0.75 for HIV-positive and HIV-negative, respectively). DISCUSSION: In this community-based setting, detection of carcinogenic HPV was comparable among self- and physician-administered samples. Self-collection is a feasible and accurate means of obtaining HPV samples from women in resource-poor settings or persons reluctant to undergo a pelvic examination.",
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