Community surveillance for coronary heart disease: The Framingham Cardiovascular Disease Survey. Comparisons with the Framingham Heart Study and previous short-term studies

James R. Margolis, Richard F. Gillum, Manning Feinleib, Robert Brasch, Richard Fabsitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It appears likely that intervention trials on a community scale against one or more coronary heart disease risk factors will begin in the near future. Prerequisite to the evaluation of the effectiveness of these trials is the accurate determination of coronary heart disease incidence rates. The Framingham Cardiovascular Disease Survey was undertaken to test the hypothesis that a short-term surveillance study of a defined population can generate accurate incidence rates for at least some categories of cardiovascular disease and that these rates are comparable with those obtained by longitudinal survey of the same population. In conjunction with the 1970 U.S. census, a 1 year survey was made of all new coronary heart disease events occurring in the town of Framingham, Mass. Surveillance was performed by several methods that were intentionally overlapping. During the study period, 244 coronary heart disease events occurred. Despite the relatively small size of the population, many of the well established epidemiologic characteristics of this disease were evident. The rates obtained by the cardiovascular disease survey were comparable with those obtained by the Framingham Heart Study, for the harder end points of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease, but much smaller for the softer end point of angina pectoris, especially in women. These data and those from similar studies indicate that periodic short-term surveillance studies of target populations of major intervention programs can provide an economic method of generating incidence data for the evaluation of the impact of such programs on myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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