Community socioeconomic disadvantage and the survival of infants with congenital heart defects

James E. Kucik, Wendy N. Nembhard, Pamela Kimzey Donohue, Owen Devine, Ying Wang, Cynthia S Minkovitz, Thomas Burke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the association between survival of infants with severe congenital heart defects (CHDs) and community-level indicators of socioeconomic status. Methods. We identified infants born to residents of Arizona, New Jersey, New York, and Texas between 1999 and 2007 with selected CHDs from 4 population-based, statewide birth defect surveillance programs. We linked data to the 2000 US Census to obtain 11 census tract-level socioeconomic indicators. We estimated survival probabilities and hazard ratios adjusted for individual characteristics. Results. We observed differences in infant survival for 8 community socioeconomic indicators (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e150-e157
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Congenital Heart Defects
Censuses
Social Class
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Community socioeconomic disadvantage and the survival of infants with congenital heart defects. / Kucik, James E.; Nembhard, Wendy N.; Donohue, Pamela Kimzey; Devine, Owen; Wang, Ying; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Burke, Thomas.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. e150-e157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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