Community Pediatrics: A Consistent Focus in Residency Training From 2002 to 2005

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To assess changes in community pediatrics training from 2002 to 2005. Methods: Pediatric residency program directors were surveyed in 2002 and 2005 to assess resident training experiences in community pediatrics. Program directors reported on the following: provision of training in community settings; inclusion of didactic and practical teaching on community health topics; resident involvement in legislative, advocacy, and community-based research activities; and emphasis placed on specific resources and training during resident recruitment. Cross-sectional and matched-pair analyses were conducted. Results: A total of 168 program directors participated in 2002 (81% response rate), and 161 participated in 2005 (79% response rate). In both years, more than 50% of programs required resident involvement with schools, child care centers, and child protection teams. Compared with 2002, in 2005, more programs included didactic training on legislative advocacy (69% vs 53%, P <.01) and offered a practical experience in this area (53% vs 40%, P <.05). In 2005, program directors reported greater resident involvement in providing legislative testimony (P <.05), and greater emphasis was placed on child advocacy training during resident recruitment (P <.01). Conclusions: In the last several years, there has been a consistent focus on legislative activities and child advocacy in pediatric residency programs. These findings suggest a strong perceived value of these activities and should inform efforts to rethink the content of general pediatric residency training in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-324
Number of pages4
JournalAmbulatory Pediatrics
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
Pediatrics
Child Advocacy
Matched-Pair Analysis
Child Care
Teaching
Health
Research

Keywords

  • child advocacy
  • community pediatrics
  • residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Community Pediatrics : A Consistent Focus in Residency Training From 2002 to 2005. / Solomon, Barry; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Grason, Holly; Carraccio, Carol.

In: Ambulatory Pediatrics, Vol. 7, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 321-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c5a60f127ddc4d13aaddae4087bf26b5,
title = "Community Pediatrics: A Consistent Focus in Residency Training From 2002 to 2005",
abstract = "Objective: To assess changes in community pediatrics training from 2002 to 2005. Methods: Pediatric residency program directors were surveyed in 2002 and 2005 to assess resident training experiences in community pediatrics. Program directors reported on the following: provision of training in community settings; inclusion of didactic and practical teaching on community health topics; resident involvement in legislative, advocacy, and community-based research activities; and emphasis placed on specific resources and training during resident recruitment. Cross-sectional and matched-pair analyses were conducted. Results: A total of 168 program directors participated in 2002 (81{\%} response rate), and 161 participated in 2005 (79{\%} response rate). In both years, more than 50{\%} of programs required resident involvement with schools, child care centers, and child protection teams. Compared with 2002, in 2005, more programs included didactic training on legislative advocacy (69{\%} vs 53{\%}, P <.01) and offered a practical experience in this area (53{\%} vs 40{\%}, P <.05). In 2005, program directors reported greater resident involvement in providing legislative testimony (P <.05), and greater emphasis was placed on child advocacy training during resident recruitment (P <.01). Conclusions: In the last several years, there has been a consistent focus on legislative activities and child advocacy in pediatric residency programs. These findings suggest a strong perceived value of these activities and should inform efforts to rethink the content of general pediatric residency training in the future.",
keywords = "child advocacy, community pediatrics, residency training",
author = "Barry Solomon and Minkovitz, {Cynthia S} and Holly Grason and Carol Carraccio",
year = "2007",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.ambp.2007.05.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "321--324",
journal = "Academic Pediatrics",
issn = "1876-2859",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Community Pediatrics

T2 - A Consistent Focus in Residency Training From 2002 to 2005

AU - Solomon, Barry

AU - Minkovitz, Cynthia S

AU - Grason, Holly

AU - Carraccio, Carol

PY - 2007/7

Y1 - 2007/7

N2 - Objective: To assess changes in community pediatrics training from 2002 to 2005. Methods: Pediatric residency program directors were surveyed in 2002 and 2005 to assess resident training experiences in community pediatrics. Program directors reported on the following: provision of training in community settings; inclusion of didactic and practical teaching on community health topics; resident involvement in legislative, advocacy, and community-based research activities; and emphasis placed on specific resources and training during resident recruitment. Cross-sectional and matched-pair analyses were conducted. Results: A total of 168 program directors participated in 2002 (81% response rate), and 161 participated in 2005 (79% response rate). In both years, more than 50% of programs required resident involvement with schools, child care centers, and child protection teams. Compared with 2002, in 2005, more programs included didactic training on legislative advocacy (69% vs 53%, P <.01) and offered a practical experience in this area (53% vs 40%, P <.05). In 2005, program directors reported greater resident involvement in providing legislative testimony (P <.05), and greater emphasis was placed on child advocacy training during resident recruitment (P <.01). Conclusions: In the last several years, there has been a consistent focus on legislative activities and child advocacy in pediatric residency programs. These findings suggest a strong perceived value of these activities and should inform efforts to rethink the content of general pediatric residency training in the future.

AB - Objective: To assess changes in community pediatrics training from 2002 to 2005. Methods: Pediatric residency program directors were surveyed in 2002 and 2005 to assess resident training experiences in community pediatrics. Program directors reported on the following: provision of training in community settings; inclusion of didactic and practical teaching on community health topics; resident involvement in legislative, advocacy, and community-based research activities; and emphasis placed on specific resources and training during resident recruitment. Cross-sectional and matched-pair analyses were conducted. Results: A total of 168 program directors participated in 2002 (81% response rate), and 161 participated in 2005 (79% response rate). In both years, more than 50% of programs required resident involvement with schools, child care centers, and child protection teams. Compared with 2002, in 2005, more programs included didactic training on legislative advocacy (69% vs 53%, P <.01) and offered a practical experience in this area (53% vs 40%, P <.05). In 2005, program directors reported greater resident involvement in providing legislative testimony (P <.05), and greater emphasis was placed on child advocacy training during resident recruitment (P <.01). Conclusions: In the last several years, there has been a consistent focus on legislative activities and child advocacy in pediatric residency programs. These findings suggest a strong perceived value of these activities and should inform efforts to rethink the content of general pediatric residency training in the future.

KW - child advocacy

KW - community pediatrics

KW - residency training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547124051&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547124051&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ambp.2007.05.002

DO - 10.1016/j.ambp.2007.05.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 17660106

AN - SCOPUS:34547124051

VL - 7

SP - 321

EP - 324

JO - Academic Pediatrics

JF - Academic Pediatrics

SN - 1876-2859

IS - 4

ER -