Community health workers providing government community case management for child survival in sub-Saharan Africa

Who are they and what are they expected to do?

Asha George, Mark Young, Rory Nefdt, Roshni Basu, Mariame Sylla, Guy Clarysse, Marika Yip Bannicq, Alexandra De Sousa, Nancy Binkin, Theresa Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We describe community health workers (CHWs) in government community case management (CCM) programs for child survival across sub-Saharan Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, 91% of 44 United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) offices responded to a cross-sectional survey in 2010. Frequencies describe CHW profiles and activities in government CCM programs (N = 29). Although a few programs paid CHWs a salary or conversely, rewarded CHWs purely on a non-financial basis, most programs combined financial and non-financial incentives and had training for 1 week. Not all programs allowed CHWs to provide zinc, use timers, dispense antibiotics, or use rapid diagnostic tests. Many CHWs undertake health promotion, but fewer CHWs provide soap, water treatment products, indoor residual spraying, or ready-to-use therapeutic foods. For newborn care, very few promote kangaroo care, and they do not provide antibiotics or resuscitation. Even if CHWs are as varied as the health systems in which they work, more work must be done in terms of the design and implementation of the CHW programs for them to realize their potential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume87
Issue numberSUPPL.5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Africa South of the Sahara
Case Management
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Macropodidae
Soaps
United Nations
Water Purification
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Therapeutic Uses
Health Promotion
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Resuscitation
Zinc
Motivation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Newborn Infant
Food
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Community health workers providing government community case management for child survival in sub-Saharan Africa : Who are they and what are they expected to do? / George, Asha; Young, Mark; Nefdt, Rory; Basu, Roshni; Sylla, Mariame; Clarysse, Guy; Bannicq, Marika Yip; De Sousa, Alexandra; Binkin, Nancy; Diaz, Theresa.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 87, No. SUPPL.5, 2012, p. 85-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

George, Asha ; Young, Mark ; Nefdt, Rory ; Basu, Roshni ; Sylla, Mariame ; Clarysse, Guy ; Bannicq, Marika Yip ; De Sousa, Alexandra ; Binkin, Nancy ; Diaz, Theresa. / Community health workers providing government community case management for child survival in sub-Saharan Africa : Who are they and what are they expected to do?. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2012 ; Vol. 87, No. SUPPL.5. pp. 85-91.
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