Community Engagement to Address Cancer Health Disparities: A Process EVALUATION using the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool

Qiana L. Brown, Ahmed Elmi, Lee R Bone, Frances A Stillman, Olive Mbah, Janice Bowie, Jennifer Wenzel, Alexandra Gray, Jean G. Ford, Jimmie L. Slade, Adrian S Dobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: African Americans suffer disproportionately from cancer health disparities, and population-level prevention is needed. OBJECTIVES: A community-academic partnership to address cancer health disparities in two predominately African American jurisdictions in Maryland was evaluated. METHODS: The Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT) was used in a process evaluation to assess the partnership in eight domains (partnership synergy, leadership, efficiency, management, resources, decision making, participation, and satisfaction). RESULTS: Mean scores in each domain were high, indicative of a functional and synergistic partnership. However, scores for decision making (Baltimore City's mean score = 9.3; Prince George's County's mean score = 10.8; p = .02) and participation (Baltimore City's mean score = 16.0; Prince George's County's mean score = 18.0; p = .04) were significantly lower in Baltimore City. CONCLUSIONS: Community-academic partnerships are promising approaches to help address cancer health disparities in African American communities. Factors that influence decision making and participation within partnerships require further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-104
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Baltimore
self-assessment
African Americans
Decision Making
cancer
Health
health
community
Neoplasms
decision making
participation
demographic situation
Research
Population
synergy
Self-Assessment
jurisdiction
leadership
efficiency
evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Community Engagement to Address Cancer Health Disparities : A Process EVALUATION using the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool. / Brown, Qiana L.; Elmi, Ahmed; Bone, Lee R; Stillman, Frances A; Mbah, Olive; Bowie, Janice; Wenzel, Jennifer; Gray, Alexandra; Ford, Jean G.; Slade, Jimmie L.; Dobs, Adrian S.

In: Progress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 97-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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