Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression

Theodore D. Satterthwaite, Joseph W. Kable, Lillie Vandekar, Natalie Katchmar, Danielle S. Bassett, Claudia F. Baldassano, Kosha Ruparel, Mark A. Elliott, Yvette I. Sheline, Ruben C. Gur, Raquel E. Gur, Christos Davatzikos, Ellen Leibenluft, Michael E. Thase, Daniel H. Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Unipolar and bipolar depressive episodes have a similar clinical presentation that suggests common dysfunction of the brain's reward system. Here, we evaluated the relationship of both dimensional depression severity and diagnostic category to reward system function in both bipolar and unipolar depression. In total, 89 adults were included, including 27 with bipolar depression, 25 with unipolar depression, and 37 healthy comparison subjects. Subjects completed both a monetary reward task and a resting-state acquisition during 3T BOLD fMRI. Across disorders, depression severity was significantly associated with reduced activation for wins compared with losses in bilateral ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and right anterior insula. Resting-state connectivity within this reward network was also diminished in proportion to depression severity, most notably connectivity strength in the left ventral striatum. In addition, there were categorical differences between patient groups: resting-state connectivity at multiple reward network nodes was higher in bipolar than in unipolar depression. Reduced reward system task activation and resting-state connectivity therefore appear to be a brain phenotype that is dimensionally related to depression severity in both bipolar and unipolar depression. In contrast, categorical differences in reward system resting connectivity between unipolar and bipolar depression may reflect differential risk of mania. Reward system dysfunction thus represents a common brain mechanism with relevance that spans categories of psychiatric diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2258-2268
Number of pages11
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Depressive Disorder
Reward
Bipolar Disorder
Depression
Gyrus Cinguli
Brain
Mental Disorders
Healthy Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Satterthwaite, T. D., Kable, J. W., Vandekar, L., Katchmar, N., Bassett, D. S., Baldassano, C. F., ... Wolf, D. H. (2015). Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression. Neuropsychopharmacology, 40(9), 2258-2268. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2015.75

Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression. / Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Kable, Joseph W.; Vandekar, Lillie; Katchmar, Natalie; Bassett, Danielle S.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.; Davatzikos, Christos; Leibenluft, Ellen; Thase, Michael E.; Wolf, Daniel H.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 40, No. 9, 13.03.2015, p. 2258-2268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Satterthwaite, TD, Kable, JW, Vandekar, L, Katchmar, N, Bassett, DS, Baldassano, CF, Ruparel, K, Elliott, MA, Sheline, YI, Gur, RC, Gur, RE, Davatzikos, C, Leibenluft, E, Thase, ME & Wolf, DH 2015, 'Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression', Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 40, no. 9, pp. 2258-2268. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2015.75
Satterthwaite TD, Kable JW, Vandekar L, Katchmar N, Bassett DS, Baldassano CF et al. Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015 Mar 13;40(9):2258-2268. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2015.75
Satterthwaite, Theodore D. ; Kable, Joseph W. ; Vandekar, Lillie ; Katchmar, Natalie ; Bassett, Danielle S. ; Baldassano, Claudia F. ; Ruparel, Kosha ; Elliott, Mark A. ; Sheline, Yvette I. ; Gur, Ruben C. ; Gur, Raquel E. ; Davatzikos, Christos ; Leibenluft, Ellen ; Thase, Michael E. ; Wolf, Daniel H. / Common and Dissociable Dysfunction of the Reward System in Bipolar and Unipolar Depression. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015 ; Vol. 40, No. 9. pp. 2258-2268.
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