Commercial Baby Food Consumption and Dietary Variety in a Statewide Sample of Infants Receiving Benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

Kristen Marie Hurley, Maureen M. Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60% received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81% received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=54, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1537-1541
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume110
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Food Assistance
WIC Program
infant foods
food consumption
vegetables
complementary foods
Food
fruits
Vegetables
infancy
Fruit
sampling
diet recall
confidence interval
Telephone
Mothers
Parturition
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{b0999eeda12443c98b81ad3a4f05e5da,
title = "Commercial Baby Food Consumption and Dietary Variety in a Statewide Sample of Infants Receiving Benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children",
abstract = "Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54{\%} had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60{\%} received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98{\%} had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81{\%} received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=54, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.26-0.84; P",
author = "Hurley, {Kristen Marie} and Black, {Maureen M.}",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jada.2010.07.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "110",
pages = "1537--1541",
journal = "Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics",
issn = "2212-2672",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Commercial Baby Food Consumption and Dietary Variety in a Statewide Sample of Infants Receiving Benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

AU - Hurley, Kristen Marie

AU - Black, Maureen M.

PY - 2010/10

Y1 - 2010/10

N2 - Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60% received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81% received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=54, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84; P

AB - Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60% received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81% received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=54, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84; P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957008904&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957008904&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jada.2010.07.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jada.2010.07.002

M3 - Article

C2 - 20869494

AN - SCOPUS:77957008904

VL - 110

SP - 1537

EP - 1541

JO - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

SN - 2212-2672

IS - 10

ER -