Commentary on the Study: “What Do Workplace Wellness Programs Do? Evidence From the Illinois Workplace Wellness Study”

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recently, several high-profile randomized clinical trials conducted with employees at the University of Illinois and BJ’s Wholesale Club have questioned the value of workplace health and well-being programs. This commentary focuses on the latest research published in The Quarterly Journal of Economics by authors Jones, Molitor, and Reif who evaluated the iThrive wellness program. The commentary challenges the study’s main finding that wellness programs (in general) do not work. Several perspectives are explored including whether the evaluated programs are well-designed, sufficiently potent, and appropriate candidates for randomized trials. The article also asks what role employers can or should play in improving the health and well-being of Americans given recent troubling statistics showing a decline in life expectancy and an increase in health risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-444
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • culture change
  • health policy
  • interventions
  • opportunity
  • opportunity
  • research
  • specific settings
  • strategies
  • strategies
  • workplace

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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