Combining cluster surveys to estimate vaccination coverage: Experiences from Nigeria's multiple indicator cluster survey / national immunization coverage survey (MICS/NICS), 2016–17

Dale A. Rhoda, John Ndegwa Wagai, Bo Robert Beshanski-Pedersen, Yusuf Yusafari, Jenny Sequeira, Kyla Hayford, David W. Brown, M. Carolina Danovaro-Holliday, Fiona Braka, Daniel Ali, Faisal Shuaib, Bassey Okposen, Eric Nwaze, Isiaka Olarewaju, Adeyemi Adeniran, Modibo Kassogue, Denis Jobin, Tove K. Ryman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 2015 immunization stakeholders in Nigeria were proceeding with plans that would have fielded two nationally representative surveys to estimate vaccination coverage at the same time. Rather than duplicate efforts and generate either conflicting or redundant results, the stakeholders collaborated to conduct a combined Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) / National Immunization Coverage Survey (NICS) with MICS focusing on core sampling clusters and NICS adding supplementary clusters in 20 states, to improve precision of outcomes there. This paper describes the organizational and technical aspects of that collaboration, including details on design of the sample supplement and analysis of the pooled dataset. While complicated, the collaboration was successful; it yielded a unified set of relevant coverage estimates and fostered some novel sub-national results dissemination work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6174-6183
Number of pages10
JournalVaccine
Volume38
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 3 2020

Keywords

  • Cluster survey
  • Immunization
  • Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS)
  • Nigeria
  • Pooled data
  • Vaccination coverage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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