Combat Stressors Predicting Perceived Stress Among Previously Deployed Soldiers

Mary M. Mitchell, M. Shayne Gallaway, Amy Millikan, Michael R. Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While combat exposures are considered principle stressors in developing mental health problems, research suggests social support can reduce this risk. Using data from 1,592 previously deployed soldiers, we found five classes of soldiers based on their patterns of responses to items measuring perceived stress. In subsequent analyses, we found increased combat exposure predicted membership in classes with greater combat-related stress, while greater unit cohesion predicted membership in classes with lower perceived stress. Also, greater willingness to report misconduct predicted greater unit cohesion. Results suggest that unit cohesion plays a vital role in the reduction of perceived stress among soldiers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-586
Number of pages14
JournalMilitary Psychology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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