Colorectal cancer screening: Do we practice what we preach?

Patrick Colquhoun, Eric G. Weiss, Jonathan Efron, Juan J. Nogueras, Anthony M. Vernava, Steven D. Wexner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Compliance rates for colorectal cancer screening have been reported as low, and ignorance is the most common factor sighted to explain this. The aim of this study was to determine screening compliance among colorectal surgeons assumed to be educated of the risks of colorectal cancer. Methods: A postal survey was distributed to the members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results: A total of 1195 members were surveyed. All respondents indicated that they advocate screening. Colonoscopy every 10 years and annual fecal occult blood testing were the most common strategies advocated to individuals with baseline risk. Colonoscopy every 5 years and annual fecal occult blood testing were the most common strategies advocated to patients with a first-degree relative with polyps or cancer. Most of these colorectal surgeons initiated their screening before 50 years of age. Conclusion: Colorectal cancer screening compliance is high among members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. These rates may be the result of awareness of the risks of colorectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-85
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Innovation
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Colonos-copy
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Colorectal surgeon
  • Compliance
  • Fecal occult blood test
  • Polyps
  • Surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Colquhoun, P., Weiss, E. G., Efron, J., Nogueras, J. J., Vernava, A. M., & Wexner, S. D. (2006). Colorectal cancer screening: Do we practice what we preach? Surgical Innovation, 13(2), 81-85. https://doi.org/10.1177/1553350606290163