Colonization sites of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of extended care facilities

Simone M. Shurland, O. Colin Stine, Richard A. Venezia, Jennifer K. Johnson, Zhan Min, Jon P. Furuno, Ram R. Miller, Tamara Johnson, Mary Claire Roghmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The anterior nares are the most sensitive single site for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA colonization are unknown. OBJECTIVES. To assess whether residents of extended care facilities who are colonized with USA300 MRSA have different nares or skin colonization findings, compared with residents who are colonized with non-USA300 MRSA strains. METHODS. The study population included residents of 5 extended care units in 3 separate facilities who had a recent history of MRSA colonization. Specimens were obtained weekly for surveillance cultures from the anterior nares, perineum, axilla, and skin breakdown (if present) for 3 weeks. MRSA isolates were categorized as USA300 MRSA or non-USA300 MRSA. RESULTS. Of the 193 residents who tested positive for MRSA, 165 were colonized in the anterior nares, and 119 were colonized on their skin. Eighty-four percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents had anterior nares colonization, compared with 86% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .80). Sixty-six percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents were colonized on the skin, compared with 59% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .30). CONCLUSIONS. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA and non-USA300 MRSA are similar in residents of extended care facilities. Anterior nares cultures will detect most - but not all - people who are colonized with MRSA, regardless of whether it is USA300 or non-USA300 MRSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-318
Number of pages6
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Skilled Nursing Facilities
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Skin
Perineum
Axilla

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Shurland, S. M., Stine, O. C., Venezia, R. A., Johnson, J. K., Min, Z., Furuno, J. P., ... Roghmann, M. C. (2009). Colonization sites of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of extended care facilities. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 30(4), 313-318. https://doi.org/10.1086/596114

Colonization sites of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of extended care facilities. / Shurland, Simone M.; Stine, O. Colin; Venezia, Richard A.; Johnson, Jennifer K.; Min, Zhan; Furuno, Jon P.; Miller, Ram R.; Johnson, Tamara; Roghmann, Mary Claire.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 30, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 313-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shurland, SM, Stine, OC, Venezia, RA, Johnson, JK, Min, Z, Furuno, JP, Miller, RR, Johnson, T & Roghmann, MC 2009, 'Colonization sites of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of extended care facilities', Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 313-318. https://doi.org/10.1086/596114
Shurland, Simone M. ; Stine, O. Colin ; Venezia, Richard A. ; Johnson, Jennifer K. ; Min, Zhan ; Furuno, Jon P. ; Miller, Ram R. ; Johnson, Tamara ; Roghmann, Mary Claire. / Colonization sites of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in residents of extended care facilities. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2009 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 313-318.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND. The anterior nares are the most sensitive single site for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA colonization are unknown. OBJECTIVES. To assess whether residents of extended care facilities who are colonized with USA300 MRSA have different nares or skin colonization findings, compared with residents who are colonized with non-USA300 MRSA strains. METHODS. The study population included residents of 5 extended care units in 3 separate facilities who had a recent history of MRSA colonization. Specimens were obtained weekly for surveillance cultures from the anterior nares, perineum, axilla, and skin breakdown (if present) for 3 weeks. MRSA isolates were categorized as USA300 MRSA or non-USA300 MRSA. RESULTS. Of the 193 residents who tested positive for MRSA, 165 were colonized in the anterior nares, and 119 were colonized on their skin. Eighty-four percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents had anterior nares colonization, compared with 86{\%} of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .80). Sixty-six percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents were colonized on the skin, compared with 59{\%} of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .30). CONCLUSIONS. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA and non-USA300 MRSA are similar in residents of extended care facilities. Anterior nares cultures will detect most - but not all - people who are colonized with MRSA, regardless of whether it is USA300 or non-USA300 MRSA.",
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AU - Shurland, Simone M.

AU - Stine, O. Colin

AU - Venezia, Richard A.

AU - Johnson, Jennifer K.

AU - Min, Zhan

AU - Furuno, Jon P.

AU - Miller, Ram R.

AU - Johnson, Tamara

AU - Roghmann, Mary Claire

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N2 - BACKGROUND. The anterior nares are the most sensitive single site for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA colonization are unknown. OBJECTIVES. To assess whether residents of extended care facilities who are colonized with USA300 MRSA have different nares or skin colonization findings, compared with residents who are colonized with non-USA300 MRSA strains. METHODS. The study population included residents of 5 extended care units in 3 separate facilities who had a recent history of MRSA colonization. Specimens were obtained weekly for surveillance cultures from the anterior nares, perineum, axilla, and skin breakdown (if present) for 3 weeks. MRSA isolates were categorized as USA300 MRSA or non-USA300 MRSA. RESULTS. Of the 193 residents who tested positive for MRSA, 165 were colonized in the anterior nares, and 119 were colonized on their skin. Eighty-four percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents had anterior nares colonization, compared with 86% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .80). Sixty-six percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents were colonized on the skin, compared with 59% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .30). CONCLUSIONS. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA and non-USA300 MRSA are similar in residents of extended care facilities. Anterior nares cultures will detect most - but not all - people who are colonized with MRSA, regardless of whether it is USA300 or non-USA300 MRSA.

AB - BACKGROUND. The anterior nares are the most sensitive single site for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA colonization are unknown. OBJECTIVES. To assess whether residents of extended care facilities who are colonized with USA300 MRSA have different nares or skin colonization findings, compared with residents who are colonized with non-USA300 MRSA strains. METHODS. The study population included residents of 5 extended care units in 3 separate facilities who had a recent history of MRSA colonization. Specimens were obtained weekly for surveillance cultures from the anterior nares, perineum, axilla, and skin breakdown (if present) for 3 weeks. MRSA isolates were categorized as USA300 MRSA or non-USA300 MRSA. RESULTS. Of the 193 residents who tested positive for MRSA, 165 were colonized in the anterior nares, and 119 were colonized on their skin. Eighty-four percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents had anterior nares colonization, compared with 86% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .80). Sixty-six percent of USA300 MRSA-colonized residents were colonized on the skin, compared with 59% of residents colonized with non-USA300 MRSA (P = .30). CONCLUSIONS. Colonization patterns of USA300 MRSA and non-USA300 MRSA are similar in residents of extended care facilities. Anterior nares cultures will detect most - but not all - people who are colonized with MRSA, regardless of whether it is USA300 or non-USA300 MRSA.

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