Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults: Prevalence of antibiotic resistance, impact of immunization, and characterization by polymerase chain reaction with BOX primers of isolates from persistent S. pneumoniae carriers

Maria C. Rodriguez-Barradas, Reena A. Tharapel, Jean E. Groover, Karen P. Giron, Christine E. Lacke, Eric D. Houston, Richard J. Hamill, Mark C. Steinhoff, Daniel M. Musher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae was evaluated in 103 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects (<200 CD4 cells/μL, 57; ≤200 CD4 cells/μL, 46) and 39 non-HIV-infected controls who were participants in a vaccine study. At baseline, 7%, 20%, and 10% of subjects in the <200 and ≤200 CD4 cell groups and in the control group were colonized with S. pneumoniae: Rates at 6 months were 23%, 22%, and 0%, respectively. Of 34 isolates from HIV-infected subjects, 25 were penicillin-resistant and 19 were resistant to ≤ 3 antimicrobials; of 8 isolates from controls, 1 was resistant. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was significantly higher among HIV-infected subjects with <200 CD4 cells/μL than in those with more CD4 cells. Polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis with BOX primers demonstrated that 12 HIV-infected subjects were persistently colonized with the same S. pneumoniae strain for ≤ 1 month compared with none of the controls. HIV-infected subjects were more likely to be persistent pneumococcal carriers and to carry antibiotic-resistant isolates than were non-HIV-infected subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-597
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume175
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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