Colonization and subsequent skin and soft tissue infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a cohort of otherwise healthy adults infected with HIV type 1

Anita Shet, Barun Mathema, Jose R. Mediavilla, Kozue Kishii, Saurabh Mehandru, Patrick Jeane-Pierre, Mathew Laroche, Barbara M. Willey, Nathan Kreiswirth, Martin Markowitz, Barry N. Kreiswirth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Methidllin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and subsequent infection were prospectively compared among a well-defined group of 107 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who had no evidence of immune suppression and 52 epidemiologically matched, uninfected individuals. The carriage strains and infecting strains were genetically characterized The cumulative prevalence of MRSA carriage was significantly higher among HIV-infected individuals (16.8%) than among individuals without HIV infection (5.8%) (P = .04; odds ratio, 3.3 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-14.7]). Fifteen of 21 MRSA isolates recovered from colonized individuals were identified as strain USA300. Of the 10 MRSA skin and soft tissue infections observed in this study, all occurred in HIV-infected individuals who were colonized with the same strain that caused the infection. Previous antibiotic use was the only statistically significant risk factor for MRSA carriage. These data highlight the fact that MRSA colonization and infection are important clinical issues among asymptomatic HIV-1-infected individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-93
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume200
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Soft Tissue Infections
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus
HIV-1
Skin
Infection
HIV
HIV Infections
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy

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Colonization and subsequent skin and soft tissue infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a cohort of otherwise healthy adults infected with HIV type 1. / Shet, Anita; Mathema, Barun; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Kishii, Kozue; Mehandru, Saurabh; Jeane-Pierre, Patrick; Laroche, Mathew; Willey, Barbara M.; Kreiswirth, Nathan; Markowitz, Martin; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 200, No. 1, 01.07.2009, p. 88-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shet, A, Mathema, B, Mediavilla, JR, Kishii, K, Mehandru, S, Jeane-Pierre, P, Laroche, M, Willey, BM, Kreiswirth, N, Markowitz, M & Kreiswirth, BN 2009, 'Colonization and subsequent skin and soft tissue infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a cohort of otherwise healthy adults infected with HIV type 1', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 200, no. 1, pp. 88-93. https://doi.org/10.1086/599315
Shet, Anita ; Mathema, Barun ; Mediavilla, Jose R. ; Kishii, Kozue ; Mehandru, Saurabh ; Jeane-Pierre, Patrick ; Laroche, Mathew ; Willey, Barbara M. ; Kreiswirth, Nathan ; Markowitz, Martin ; Kreiswirth, Barry N. / Colonization and subsequent skin and soft tissue infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a cohort of otherwise healthy adults infected with HIV type 1. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 200, No. 1. pp. 88-93.
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