College mentors: A view from the inside of an intervention to promote health behaviors and prevent obesity among low-income, urban, african american adolescents

Maureen M. Black, Sonia S. Arteaga, JoAnn Sanders, Erin R. Hager, Jean A. Anliker, Joel Gittelsohn, Yan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examined the views of college mentors who administered Challenge!-a home-and community-based health promotion/overweight prevention intervention that effectively reduced the progression to overweight among African American adolescents. In-depth qualitative interviews among 17 mentors (81%) conducted 1 year following the intervention yielded four primary findings: (a) the importance of a strong mentor-mentee relationship often extending beyond the issues of diet and physical activity, (b) concern at the adversities the adolescents faced (e.g., poverty and household instability); (c) the personal impact of the mentoring process on the mentors' own dietary and physical activity behavior and career choices; and (d) recommendations regarding subsequent mentoring programs. In summary, college students are a valuable resource as mentors for low-income, African American adolescents and provide insights into the success of health promotion/overweight prevention interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Mentors
Health Behavior
African Americans
Obesity
Health Promotion
Exercise
Career Choice
Poverty
Interviews
Students
Diet

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • African American
  • college mentors
  • health promotion
  • obesity
  • overweight prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

College mentors : A view from the inside of an intervention to promote health behaviors and prevent obesity among low-income, urban, african american adolescents. / Black, Maureen M.; Arteaga, Sonia S.; Sanders, JoAnn; Hager, Erin R.; Anliker, Jean A.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Wang, Yan.

In: Health Promotion Practice, Vol. 13, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 238-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Black, Maureen M. ; Arteaga, Sonia S. ; Sanders, JoAnn ; Hager, Erin R. ; Anliker, Jean A. ; Gittelsohn, Joel ; Wang, Yan. / College mentors : A view from the inside of an intervention to promote health behaviors and prevent obesity among low-income, urban, african american adolescents. In: Health Promotion Practice. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 238-244.
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