Collateral Punishments and Sentencing Policy: Perceptions of Residence Restrictions for Sex Offenders and Drunk Drivers

Jill S. Levenson, Ryan T. Shields, David A. Singleton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Residence restrictions, which prohibit sex offenders from living within close proximity to places where children congregate, have grown popular. Participants (n = 255) were asked to participate in a survey rating and comparing their perceptions of residence restrictions for drunk drivers and sex offenders. Residence restrictions were seen as more punitive for DUI offenders than for sex offenders, though a majority of the sample viewed making either offender leave their home as punishment. Those who believed that most sex offenders would reoffend were significantly less likely to view these policies as punitive. Older respondents and those who knew someone convicted of a crime were also less likely to view residence restrictions as punitive. The results of the current study indicate that although many of the respondents were not optimistic about the effectiveness of residence restrictions in reducing victimization, those policies still garnered considerable support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-158
Number of pages24
JournalCriminal Justice Policy Review
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Keywords

  • punishment
  • residence restrictions
  • sentencing
  • sex offender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

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