Cold visceral perfusion improves early survival in patients with acute renal failure after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair

Heitham T. Hassoun, Charles C. Miller, Tam T.T. Huynh, Anthony L. Estrera, Jesse J. Smith, Hazim J. Safi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Despite advances in organ protection during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, acute renal failure (ARF) remains a significant clinical problem, associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We studied outcome of ARF after TAAA repair in patients who underwent either warm or cold visceral perfusion. Method: Between 1991 and 2001 657 TAAA repairs were performed, of which 359 (55%) had either warm or cold visceral perfusion. Twelve patients with renal failure who had undergone preoperative dialysis were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 347 patients, ARF developed in 81 (23%) after TAAA repair. Forty-four (54%) of the 81 patients with ARF received cold visceral perfusion, and 37 (46%) patients received warm visceral perfusion. ARF was defined as either an increase of 1 mg/dL in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration per day for 2 consecutive days or dialysis requirement. Patient records were reviewed through hospital discharge. Results: Twenty six (32%) of the 81 patients in whom ARF developed died, 17 of 37 (46%) patients in the warm perfusion group versus 9 of 44 (21%) patients in the cold perfusion group (P < .02). Median onset of ARF was on postoperative day 1 in both groups. Twenty-six of 81 (32%) patients recovered renal function, 10 of 37 (27%) patients in the warm perfusion group versus 16 of 44 (36%) patients in the cold perfusion group. Preoperative SCr concentration was predictive of recovery of renal function (odds ratio, 4.5 per mg/dL increase; P < .03) in patients who received either warm or cold visceral perfusion. Conclusions: ARF after TAAA repair remains a significant clinical problem. Recovery of renal function occurred in approximately one third of patients. Preoperative SCr concentration was the only significant determinant of recovered renal function. While cold visceral perfusion did not alter renal recovery, it significantly reduced hospital mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)506-512
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of vascular surgery
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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