Cohabitation, marriage, divorce, and remarriage in the United States

Matthew D. Bramlett, William D. Mosher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives This report presents national estimates of the probabilities of marital and cohabitation outcomes for women 15-44 years of age in 1995, by a wide variety of individual-and community-level characteristics. The life-table analysis in this report takes a life cycle approach to estimate the probabilities that: a woman will marry for the first time, an intact first cohabitation will make the transition to marriage, a first cohabitation will end in separation, a first marriage will end in separation or divorce, a disrupted first marriage will be followed by a new cohabitation, a separation from first marriage will result in divorce, a divorce from first marriage will be followed by remarriage, and a second marriage will end in separation or divorce. Methods The life-table estimates presented here are based on a nationally representative sample of women 15-44 years of age in the United States in 1995 from the National Survey of Family Growth, Cycle 5. Results The analyses show that various individual and community-level characteristics are related to the marital and cohabitational outcomes examined in this report. The results consistently demonstrate that the cohabitations and marriages of non-Hispanic black women are less stable than those of non-Hispanic white women. An analysis of trends over time suggests that differences by race/ethnicity are becoming more pronounced in recent years. Racial differences observed are associated with individual characteristics and with the characteristics of the communities in which the women live.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalVital and Health Statistics, Series 23: Data from the National Survey of Family Growth
Volume23
Issue number22
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Cohabitation
  • Context
  • Divorce
  • Marriage
  • Remarriage
  • Separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

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