Cognitive Dysfunction and Other Comorbidities: Cognitive Consequences of Seizures Early in Life: Insights from the Kainic Acid Model

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Seizures in the neonatal period and early childhood are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral consequences in humans. Parallel studies in animal models have corroborated those deficits, and offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms by which seizures induce cognitive impairments in the developing brain. The experimental program described here uses the glutamate analog kainic acid (KA) to induce seizures at various postnatal ages; subsequently, cognitive and behavioral consequences of the seizures are examined. The KA model mimics acquired complex partial seizures with secondary generalization. Using the KA model, investigators have established that cognitive consequences of seizures are age dependent - adult rodents exhibit significant cognitive problems and deficits in learning and memory following KA seizures, while young animals exhibit qualitatively similar though less-severe deficits. These cognitive deficits in the immature brain are independent of neuronal cell death and significant axonal reorganization. The mechanisms by which seizures early in life cause adverse cognitive sequelae are under investigation. Ultimately, the goal is to develop strategies to prevent cognitive deficits in young patients with seizures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Basic Epilepsy Research
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages155-159
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780123739612
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Brain development
  • Cognition
  • Epilepsy
  • Kainic acid
  • Seizures
  • Water maze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

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