Cognitive correlates of human brain aging: A quantitative magnetic resonance imaging investigation

C. E. Coffey, G. Ratcliff, J. A. Saxton, R. N. Bryan, L. P. Fried, J. F. Lucke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relations between age-related changes in brain structure and neuropsychological test performance in 320 elderly nonclinical volunteers (ages 66-90) were examined by using quantitative MRI data and measures of attention, information processing speed, language, memory, and visuospatial ability. Final path analyses revealed significant brain - behavior relationships for two of the six cognitive measures: the Trail Making Test part B and visual delayed memory. Poorer performance on Trails B was associated with smaller cerebral hemisphere volumes and larger volumes of peripheral CSF, lateral ventricles, and third ventricle. Poorer recall on visual delayed memory was associated with larger volumes of the lateral ventricles and third ventricle. The findings demonstrate a relationship between age-related changes in brain structure and an age-related decline in attention, psychomotor speed, and visual delayed memory. The neurobiological basis for this relationship requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-485
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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