Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating

Ruth H. Striegel-Moore, G. Terence Wilson, Lynn DeBar, Nancy A Perrin, Frances Lynch, Francine Rosselli, Helena C. Kraemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Despite proven efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating eating disorders with binge eating as the core symptom, few patients receive CBT in clinical practice. Our blended efficacy-effectiveness study sought to evaluate whether a manual-based guided self-help form of CBT (CBT-GSH), delivered in 8 sessions in a health maintenance organization setting over a 12-week period by master's-level interventionists, is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU). Method: In all, 123 individuals (mean age = 37.2; 91.9% female, 96.7% non-Hispanic White) were randomized, including 10.6% with bulimia nervosa (BN), 48% with binge eating disorder (BED), and 41.4% with recurrent binge eating in the absence of BN or BED. Baseline, posttreatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-up data were used in intent-to-treat analyses. Results: At 12-month follow-up, CBT-GSH resulted in greater abstinence from binge eating (64.2%) than TAU (44.6%; number needed to treat = 5), as measured by the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Secondary outcomes reflected greater improvements in the CBT-GSH group in dietary restraint (d = 0.30); eating, shape, and weight concern (ds = 0.54, 1.01, 0.49, respectively; measured by the EDE Questionnaire); depression (d = 0.56; Beck Depression Inventory); and social adjustment (d = 0.58; Work and Social Adjustment Scale), but not weight change. Conclusions: CBT-GSH is a viable first-line treatment option for the majority of patients with recurrent binge eating who do not meet diagnostic criteria for BN or anorexia nervosa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-321
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia
Cognitive Therapy
Binge-Eating Disorder
Bulimia Nervosa
Social Adjustment
Therapeutics
Depression
Weights and Measures
Numbers Needed To Treat
Health Maintenance Organizations
Anorexia Nervosa
Eating
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • binge eating
  • cognitive behavior therapy
  • effectiveness
  • guided self-help

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Striegel-Moore, R. H., Wilson, G. T., DeBar, L., Perrin, N. A., Lynch, F., Rosselli, F., & Kraemer, H. C. (2010). Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78(3), 312-321. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0018915

Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating. / Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Wilson, G. Terence; DeBar, Lynn; Perrin, Nancy A; Lynch, Frances; Rosselli, Francine; Kraemer, Helena C.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 78, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 312-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Striegel-Moore, RH, Wilson, GT, DeBar, L, Perrin, NA, Lynch, F, Rosselli, F & Kraemer, HC 2010, 'Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 312-321. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0018915
Striegel-Moore, Ruth H. ; Wilson, G. Terence ; DeBar, Lynn ; Perrin, Nancy A ; Lynch, Frances ; Rosselli, Francine ; Kraemer, Helena C. / Cognitive Behavioral Guided Self-Help for the Treatment of Recurrent Binge Eating. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 312-321.
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