Cod1p/Spf1p is a P-type ATPase involved in ER function and Ca2+ homeostasis

Stephen R. Cronin, Rajini Rao, Randolph Y. Hampton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The internal environment of the ER is regulated to accommodate essential cellular processes, yet our understanding of this regulation remains incomplete. Cod1p/Spf1p belongs to the widely conserved, uncharacterized type V branch of P-type ATPases, a large family of ion pumps. Our previous work suggested Cod1p may function in the ER. Consistent with this hypothesis, we localized Cod1p to the ER membrane. The cod1Δ mutant disrupted cellular calcium homeostasis, causing increased transcription of calcium-regulated genes and a synergistic increase in cellular calcium when paired with disruption of the Golgi apparatus-localized Ca2+ pump Pmrlp. Deletion of COD1 also impaired ER function, causing constitutive activation of the unfolded protein response, hypersensitivity to the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin, and synthetic lethality with deletion of the unfolded protein response regulator HAC1. Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster homologue of Cod1p complemented the cod1Δ mutant. Finally, we demonstrated the ATPase activity of the purified protein. This study provides the first biochemical characterization of a type V P-type ATPase, implicates Codlp in ER function and ion homeostasis, and indicates that these functions are conserved among Cod1p's metazoan homologues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1017-1028
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume157
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2002

Keywords

  • Endoplasmic reticulum
  • Ion transport
  • Magnesium
  • Protein folding
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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