Cockroach allergen abatement with extermination and sodium hypochlorite cleaning in inner-city homes

Robert A Wood, P. A. Eggleston, Cynthia S Rand, W. J. Nixon, Sukon Kanchanaraksa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Although the importance of cockroach allergen in chronic asthma has now been well defined, little progress has been made in the control of cockroach allergen in infested homes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a combination of professional pest extermination and household cleaning using a solution of sodium hypochlorite to reduce cockroach infestation and allergen levels in cockroach infested homes. Methods: Seventeen cockroach-infested homes were studied with three homes serving as controls. In the intervention homes, a professional exterminator applied 0.05% abamectin twice at 2-week intervals at study entry and a professional cleaner cleaned the homes before and after the extermination. All washable surfaces were cleaned throughout the study with a solution of 0.5% hypochlorite. Monthly home visits were conducted to inspect the home, interview the homeowner, place passive cockroach traps, and to collect settled dust samples from the kitchen, bedroom, and TV/living room. Results: The number of cockroaches in the passive traps decreased rapidly after the initial intervention in most homes. Median Blatella germanica allergen 1 levels in the settled dust samples fell by 91% in the kitchen, 78% in the bedroom, and 77% in the living room over the course of the study in the intervention homes but gradually rose in the control homes. The overall reductions were very similar to those seen in a previous study with a similar protocol except for the use of the sodium hypochlorite. Conclusions: Successful extermination is possible in most inner-city homes and cockroach allergen levels can be reduced by 80% to 90%. However, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite did not seem to improve allergen reduction, and in many homes, allergen levels remained above the proposed threshold of 8 U/g of dust throughout the study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-64
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume87
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Sodium Hypochlorite
Cockroaches
Allergens
Dust
abamectin
Hypochlorous Acid
House Calls
Aptitude
Asthma
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

@article{3cc8a7add57f4b26843b146bfb9d9e97,
title = "Cockroach allergen abatement with extermination and sodium hypochlorite cleaning in inner-city homes",
abstract = "Background: Although the importance of cockroach allergen in chronic asthma has now been well defined, little progress has been made in the control of cockroach allergen in infested homes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a combination of professional pest extermination and household cleaning using a solution of sodium hypochlorite to reduce cockroach infestation and allergen levels in cockroach infested homes. Methods: Seventeen cockroach-infested homes were studied with three homes serving as controls. In the intervention homes, a professional exterminator applied 0.05{\%} abamectin twice at 2-week intervals at study entry and a professional cleaner cleaned the homes before and after the extermination. All washable surfaces were cleaned throughout the study with a solution of 0.5{\%} hypochlorite. Monthly home visits were conducted to inspect the home, interview the homeowner, place passive cockroach traps, and to collect settled dust samples from the kitchen, bedroom, and TV/living room. Results: The number of cockroaches in the passive traps decreased rapidly after the initial intervention in most homes. Median Blatella germanica allergen 1 levels in the settled dust samples fell by 91{\%} in the kitchen, 78{\%} in the bedroom, and 77{\%} in the living room over the course of the study in the intervention homes but gradually rose in the control homes. The overall reductions were very similar to those seen in a previous study with a similar protocol except for the use of the sodium hypochlorite. Conclusions: Successful extermination is possible in most inner-city homes and cockroach allergen levels can be reduced by 80{\%} to 90{\%}. However, 0.5{\%} sodium hypochlorite did not seem to improve allergen reduction, and in many homes, allergen levels remained above the proposed threshold of 8 U/g of dust throughout the study.",
author = "Wood, {Robert A} and Eggleston, {P. A.} and Rand, {Cynthia S} and Nixon, {W. J.} and Sukon Kanchanaraksa",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "87",
pages = "60--64",
journal = "Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
issn = "1081-1206",
publisher = "American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cockroach allergen abatement with extermination and sodium hypochlorite cleaning in inner-city homes

AU - Wood, Robert A

AU - Eggleston, P. A.

AU - Rand, Cynthia S

AU - Nixon, W. J.

AU - Kanchanaraksa, Sukon

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Background: Although the importance of cockroach allergen in chronic asthma has now been well defined, little progress has been made in the control of cockroach allergen in infested homes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a combination of professional pest extermination and household cleaning using a solution of sodium hypochlorite to reduce cockroach infestation and allergen levels in cockroach infested homes. Methods: Seventeen cockroach-infested homes were studied with three homes serving as controls. In the intervention homes, a professional exterminator applied 0.05% abamectin twice at 2-week intervals at study entry and a professional cleaner cleaned the homes before and after the extermination. All washable surfaces were cleaned throughout the study with a solution of 0.5% hypochlorite. Monthly home visits were conducted to inspect the home, interview the homeowner, place passive cockroach traps, and to collect settled dust samples from the kitchen, bedroom, and TV/living room. Results: The number of cockroaches in the passive traps decreased rapidly after the initial intervention in most homes. Median Blatella germanica allergen 1 levels in the settled dust samples fell by 91% in the kitchen, 78% in the bedroom, and 77% in the living room over the course of the study in the intervention homes but gradually rose in the control homes. The overall reductions were very similar to those seen in a previous study with a similar protocol except for the use of the sodium hypochlorite. Conclusions: Successful extermination is possible in most inner-city homes and cockroach allergen levels can be reduced by 80% to 90%. However, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite did not seem to improve allergen reduction, and in many homes, allergen levels remained above the proposed threshold of 8 U/g of dust throughout the study.

AB - Background: Although the importance of cockroach allergen in chronic asthma has now been well defined, little progress has been made in the control of cockroach allergen in infested homes. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a combination of professional pest extermination and household cleaning using a solution of sodium hypochlorite to reduce cockroach infestation and allergen levels in cockroach infested homes. Methods: Seventeen cockroach-infested homes were studied with three homes serving as controls. In the intervention homes, a professional exterminator applied 0.05% abamectin twice at 2-week intervals at study entry and a professional cleaner cleaned the homes before and after the extermination. All washable surfaces were cleaned throughout the study with a solution of 0.5% hypochlorite. Monthly home visits were conducted to inspect the home, interview the homeowner, place passive cockroach traps, and to collect settled dust samples from the kitchen, bedroom, and TV/living room. Results: The number of cockroaches in the passive traps decreased rapidly after the initial intervention in most homes. Median Blatella germanica allergen 1 levels in the settled dust samples fell by 91% in the kitchen, 78% in the bedroom, and 77% in the living room over the course of the study in the intervention homes but gradually rose in the control homes. The overall reductions were very similar to those seen in a previous study with a similar protocol except for the use of the sodium hypochlorite. Conclusions: Successful extermination is possible in most inner-city homes and cockroach allergen levels can be reduced by 80% to 90%. However, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite did not seem to improve allergen reduction, and in many homes, allergen levels remained above the proposed threshold of 8 U/g of dust throughout the study.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034899767&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034899767&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11476465

AN - SCOPUS:0034899767

VL - 87

SP - 60

EP - 64

JO - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

JF - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

SN - 1081-1206

IS - 1

ER -