Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation.

J. K. Niparko, B. E. Pfingst, C. Johansson, P. R. Kileny, J. L. Kemink, A. Tjellström

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Genetically deaf dalmatian dogs and ototoxically deafened macaque monkeys were implanted with electrodes housed in cochlear wall titanium implants to assess long-term stability, tolerance, and performance. Short-term human implantation, followed by trials of stimulation, was performed in 4 unilaterally deaf patients. In the dog experiments, cochlear wall electrode stimulation produced consistent electrophysiologic thresholds that were higher, by approximately 6 dB, than those obtained with bipolar scala tympani stimulation. Clinical testing revealed electrically evoked middle latency response, auditory brain stem response, and/or behavioral detection responses in 3 of 4 patients, at levels below those for facial nerve activation and pain sensation. Electrode place discrimination studies, with controls for loudness cues, revealed near-perfect discrimination in a monkey subject. Eleven of the 12 animal implants were found to be rigidly fixed in the cochlear bone, with direct contract between bone and implant over 8% to 23% of the implant surface for the 6 implants examined in detail. These results suggest that long-term fixation of titanium cochlear wall implants occurs by virtue of intimate implant-bone contact in restricted areas. This approach to prosthetic stimulation demonstrates encouraging performance characteristics in achieving auditory activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-454
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume102
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Acoustic Stimulation
Cochlear Nerve
Cochlea
Titanium
Bone and Bones
Haplorhini
Electrodes
Scala Tympani
Dogs
Facial Pain
Implanted Electrodes
Cochlear Implants
Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Facial Nerve
Macaca
Neuralgia
Contracts
Reaction Time
Cues
Discrimination (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Niparko, J. K., Pfingst, B. E., Johansson, C., Kileny, P. R., Kemink, J. L., & Tjellström, A. (1993). Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, 102(6), 447-454.

Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation. / Niparko, J. K.; Pfingst, B. E.; Johansson, C.; Kileny, P. R.; Kemink, J. L.; Tjellström, A.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 102, No. 6, 06.1993, p. 447-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Niparko, JK, Pfingst, BE, Johansson, C, Kileny, PR, Kemink, JL & Tjellström, A 1993, 'Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation.', Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, vol. 102, no. 6, pp. 447-454.
Niparko JK, Pfingst BE, Johansson C, Kileny PR, Kemink JL, Tjellström A. Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 1993 Jun;102(6):447-454.
Niparko, J. K. ; Pfingst, B. E. ; Johansson, C. ; Kileny, P. R. ; Kemink, J. L. ; Tjellström, A. / Cochlear wall titanium implants for auditory nerve stimulation. In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 1993 ; Vol. 102, No. 6. pp. 447-454.
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