Cocaine-Induced Redoppuction of Glucose Utilization in Human Brain: A Study Using Positron Emission Tomography and [Fluorine 18]-Fluorodeoxyglucose

Edythe D. London, Nicola G. Cascella, Dean Foster Wong, Robert L. Phillips, Robert F Dannals, Jonathan M Links, Ronald Herning, Roger Grayson, Jerome H. Jaffe, Henry N. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the effects of cocaine hydrochloride (40 mg intravenously) on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and on subjective self-reports of eight polydrug abusers in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured by the [fluorine 18]-fluorodeoxyglucose method, using positron emission tomography. With eyes covered, subjects listened to a tape that presented white noise, “beep” prompts, and questions about subjective effects of cocaine or saline. Cocaine produced euphoria and reduced glucose utilization globally (mean reduction, 14%). Twenty-six of 29 brain regions (all neocortical areas, basal ganglia, portions of the hippocampal formation, thalamus, and midbrain) showed significant decrements (5% to 26%) in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. No significant effects of cocaine were observed in the pons, the cerebellar cortex, or the vermis. Right-greater-than-left hemispheric asymmetry of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose occurred in the lateral thalamus. The findings demonstrate that reduced cerebral metabolism is associated with cocaine-induced euphoria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-574
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

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Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Cocaine
Positron-Emission Tomography
Glucose
Brain
Thalamus
Cerebellar Cortex
Pons
Mesencephalon
Basal Ganglia
Cross-Over Studies
Self Report
Hippocampus
Placebos
Fluorine
Positron Emission Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cocaine-Induced Redoppuction of Glucose Utilization in Human Brain : A Study Using Positron Emission Tomography and [Fluorine 18]-Fluorodeoxyglucose. / London, Edythe D.; Cascella, Nicola G.; Wong, Dean Foster; Phillips, Robert L.; Dannals, Robert F; Links, Jonathan M; Herning, Ronald; Grayson, Roger; Jaffe, Jerome H.; Wagner, Henry N.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 47, No. 6, 1990, p. 567-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

London, Edythe D. ; Cascella, Nicola G. ; Wong, Dean Foster ; Phillips, Robert L. ; Dannals, Robert F ; Links, Jonathan M ; Herning, Ronald ; Grayson, Roger ; Jaffe, Jerome H. ; Wagner, Henry N. / Cocaine-Induced Redoppuction of Glucose Utilization in Human Brain : A Study Using Positron Emission Tomography and [Fluorine 18]-Fluorodeoxyglucose. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 1990 ; Vol. 47, No. 6. pp. 567-574.
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