Cocaine hydrochloride and benzoylecgonine have no in vitro inhibitory effect against Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Jonathan Mark Zenilman, C. A. Reichart, T. M. Neumann, E. W. Hook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We evaluated 72 clinical Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates for in vitro susceptibility to cocaine hydrochloride and its metabolite benzoylecgonine and to penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, ceftriaxone, and ofloxacin. Although there was a wide range of susceptibilities to the antimicrobial agents, cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine, had no demonstrable antigonococcal activity. Cocaine use is frequently associated with outbreaks of sexually transmitted disease. We hypothesized that the dramatically decreasing incidence of gonorrhea over the past 15 years may be in part due to pharmacological effects of cocaine. However, since cocaine and its metabolite have no in vitro antigonococcal activity, this hypothesis is unlikely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1229
Number of pages2
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume35
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Cocaine
Ofloxacin
Ceftriaxone
Gonorrhea
Erythromycin
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Anti-Infective Agents
Tetracycline
Penicillins
Disease Outbreaks
In Vitro Techniques
benzoylecgonine
Pharmacology
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Cocaine hydrochloride and benzoylecgonine have no in vitro inhibitory effect against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. / Zenilman, Jonathan Mark; Reichart, C. A.; Neumann, T. M.; Hook, E. W.

In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Vol. 35, No. 6, 1991, p. 1228-1229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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