Cocaine administration decreases functional connectivity in human primary visual and motor cortex as detected by functional MRI

Shi Jiang Li, Bharat Biswal, Zhu Li, Robert Risinger, Charles Rainey, Jung Ki Cho, Betty Jo Salmeron, Elliot A. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted to observe the effects of cocaine administration on the physiological fluctuations of fMRI signal in two brain regions. Seven long-term cocaine users with an average age of 32 years and 8 years of cocaine use history were recruited for the study. A T2/(*)-weighted fast echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was employed at 1.5 T to acquire three sets of brain images for each subject under three conditions (at rest, after saline injection, and after cocaine injection [0.57 mg/kg]). Cross- correlation maps were constructed using the synchronous, low frequency signal from voxel time courses after filtering respiratory, cardiac, and other physiological noise. A quantitative evaluation of the changes in functional connectivity was made using spatial correlation coefficient (SCC) analysis. A marked 50% reduction in SCC values in the region of primary visual cortex and 43% reduction in SCC values in the region of primary motor cortex were observed after cocaine administration. This significant reduction in SCC values in these cortical regions is a reflection of changes in neuronal activity. It is suggested that the observed changes in low frequency components after acute cocaine administration during a resting, no-task situation may be used as a baseline reference source when assessing the effects of cocaine on task-driven activation or on mesolimbic dopamine pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-51
Number of pages7
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motor Cortex
Visual Cortex
Cocaine
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Echo-Planar Imaging
Injections
Brain
Noise
Dopamine
History

Keywords

  • Cocaine addiction
  • fMRI
  • Functional connectivity
  • Human brain
  • Physiological fluctuations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Cocaine administration decreases functional connectivity in human primary visual and motor cortex as detected by functional MRI. / Li, Shi Jiang; Biswal, Bharat; Li, Zhu; Risinger, Robert; Rainey, Charles; Cho, Jung Ki; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Stein, Elliot A.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 1, 2000, p. 45-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Shi Jiang ; Biswal, Bharat ; Li, Zhu ; Risinger, Robert ; Rainey, Charles ; Cho, Jung Ki ; Salmeron, Betty Jo ; Stein, Elliot A. / Cocaine administration decreases functional connectivity in human primary visual and motor cortex as detected by functional MRI. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 45-51.
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