Clonidine partially blocks the physiologic effects but not the subjective effects produced by smoking marijuana in male human subjects

Edward J. Cone, Phyllis Welch, W. Robert Lange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clonidine, an α2-agonist, was studied in three male human subjects in a multi-dose pilot study in combination with smoking marijuana cigarettes. Marijuana alone caused increases in responses on subjective effect questionnaires and increased heart rate. Pretreatment with single oral doses of clonidine three hours prior to marijuana induced no changes in subjective effects prior to smoking marijuana and did not diminish the subjective effects produced by marijuana. Clonidine did substantially reduce but did not abolish the marijuana-induced rise in heart rate. Based on these preliminary data from three subjects, it is concluded that clonidine does not have therapeutic value in the clinical management of active marijuana abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)649-652
Number of pages4
JournalPharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1988

Keywords

  • Clonidine
  • Human studies, males
  • Marijuana
  • Physiologic effects
  • Subjective effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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