Clinical Use of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Liver Disease, Sepsis, Trauma, and Burns

Harry C. Sax, Mark A. Talamini, Josef E. Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs)—leucine, isoleucine, and valine—share unique biochemical properties that may make them useful in altered physiologic states. They can be metabolized independently of liver function to provide energy, other amino acids, or small nitrogenous compounds. This unique ability makes the BCAAs a desirable supplement in liver disease with encephalopathy and, to a lesser extent, in sepsis with hepatic dysfunction. Furthermore, the BCAAs play a role in the regulation of protein synthesis, suggesting beneficial effects in catabolic states such as postoperative stress, trauma, renal failure, and burns. However, initial studies in these areas have presented equivocal results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-366
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Branched Chain Amino Acids
Burns
Liver Diseases
Sepsis
Wounds and Injuries
Isoleucine
Liver
Brain Diseases
Leucine
Renal Insufficiency
Amino Acids
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Clinical Use of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Liver Disease, Sepsis, Trauma, and Burns. / Sax, Harry C.; Talamini, Mark A.; Fischer, Josef E.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 121, No. 3, 1986, p. 358-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sax, Harry C. ; Talamini, Mark A. ; Fischer, Josef E. / Clinical Use of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Liver Disease, Sepsis, Trauma, and Burns. In: Archives of Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 121, No. 3. pp. 358-366.
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