Clinical reactivations of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection and human immunodeficiency virus disease progression markers

Bulbulgul Aumakhan, Charlotte A. Gaydos, Thomas C. Quinn, Chris Beyrer, Lorie Benning, Howard Minkoff, Daniel J. Merenstein, Mardge Cohen, Ruth Greenblatt, Marek Nowicki, Kathryn Anastos, Stephen J. Gange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The natural history of HSV-2 infection and role of HSV-2 reactivations in HIV disease progression are unclear. Methods: Clinical symptoms of active HSV-2 infection were used to classify 1,938 HIV/HSV-2 co-infected participants of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) into groups of varying degree of HSV-2 clinical activity. Differences in plasma HIV RNA and CD4+ T cell counts between groups were explored longitudinally across three study visits and cross-sectionally at the last study visit. Results: A dose dependent association between markers of HIV disease progression and degree of HSV-2 clinical activity was observed. In multivariate analyses after adjusting for baseline CD4+ T cell levels, active HSV-2 infection with frequent symptomatic reactivations was associated with 21% to 32% increase in the probability of detectable plasma HIV RNA (trend p = 0.004), an average of 0.27 to 0.29 log10 copies/ml higher plasma HIV RNA on a continuous scale (trend p<0.001) and 51 to 101 reduced CD4+ T cells/mm3 over time compared to asymptomatic HSV-2 infection (trend p<0.001). Conclusions: HIV induced CD4+ T cell loss was associated with frequent symptomatic HSV-2 reactivations. However, effect of HSV-2 reactivations on HIV disease progression markers in this population was modest and appears to be dependent on the frequency and severity of reactivations. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether HSV-2 reactivations contribute to acceleration of HIV disease progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere9973
JournalPloS one
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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