Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis

Samir S. Shoughy, Mahmoud O. Jaroudi, Khalid F. Tabbara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim To study the clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis treated with antituberculous therapy without concomitant use of systemic steroids. Methods We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of eight consecutive patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis. Patients were treated unsuccessfully with topical and/or systemic steroids. They underwent complete ophthalmic examination, systemic evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Tuberculin skin test was done with purified protein derivative (PPD) on all patients. The diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis was made based on clinical findings of scleritis with adjacent peripheral corneal stromal keratitis, positive PPD test of 15 mm of induration or more, response to antituberculous treatment (ATT) within 4 weeks and exclusion of other causes of sclerokeratitis. Antituberculous drugs were given for a minimum of 6 months without concomitant use of corticosteroids. The outcome measure was resolution of the ocular surface inflammation of the sclera and cornea. Results Eight consecutive patients with a diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis were included. There were one male and seven female patients. The mean age was 29 years with an age range of 7-43 years. The involvement of the sclera was nodular in six patients and diffuse in two. The involvement of the cornea consisted of peripheral corneal stromal inflammation adjacent to the area of scleritis. Patients responded to antituberculous medications with complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without topical or systemic antiinflammatory agents. Conclusions Antituberculous medications can lead to complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without concomitant use of steroids, or other anti-inflammatory agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 23 2015

Fingerprint

Scleritis
Sclera
Steroids
Cornea
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Inflammation
Tuberculin Test
Keratitis
Skin Tests
Medical Records
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Proteins
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Clinical Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis. / Shoughy, Samir S.; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O.; Tabbara, Khalid F.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, 23.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shoughy, Samir S. ; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O. ; Tabbara, Khalid F. / Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis. In: British Journal of Ophthalmology. 2015.
@article{1173f05c0fa34ffc96f716d7477dcc21,
title = "Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis",
abstract = "Aim To study the clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis treated with antituberculous therapy without concomitant use of systemic steroids. Methods We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of eight consecutive patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis. Patients were treated unsuccessfully with topical and/or systemic steroids. They underwent complete ophthalmic examination, systemic evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Tuberculin skin test was done with purified protein derivative (PPD) on all patients. The diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis was made based on clinical findings of scleritis with adjacent peripheral corneal stromal keratitis, positive PPD test of 15 mm of induration or more, response to antituberculous treatment (ATT) within 4 weeks and exclusion of other causes of sclerokeratitis. Antituberculous drugs were given for a minimum of 6 months without concomitant use of corticosteroids. The outcome measure was resolution of the ocular surface inflammation of the sclera and cornea. Results Eight consecutive patients with a diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis were included. There were one male and seven female patients. The mean age was 29 years with an age range of 7-43 years. The involvement of the sclera was nodular in six patients and diffuse in two. The involvement of the cornea consisted of peripheral corneal stromal inflammation adjacent to the area of scleritis. Patients responded to antituberculous medications with complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without topical or systemic antiinflammatory agents. Conclusions Antituberculous medications can lead to complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without concomitant use of steroids, or other anti-inflammatory agents.",
author = "Shoughy, {Samir S.} and Jaroudi, {Mahmoud O.} and Tabbara, {Khalid F.}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1136/bjophthalmol-2015-307599",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "British Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0007-1161",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical manifestations and outcome of tuberculous sclerokeratitis

AU - Shoughy, Samir S.

AU - Jaroudi, Mahmoud O.

AU - Tabbara, Khalid F.

PY - 2015/12/23

Y1 - 2015/12/23

N2 - Aim To study the clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis treated with antituberculous therapy without concomitant use of systemic steroids. Methods We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of eight consecutive patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis. Patients were treated unsuccessfully with topical and/or systemic steroids. They underwent complete ophthalmic examination, systemic evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Tuberculin skin test was done with purified protein derivative (PPD) on all patients. The diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis was made based on clinical findings of scleritis with adjacent peripheral corneal stromal keratitis, positive PPD test of 15 mm of induration or more, response to antituberculous treatment (ATT) within 4 weeks and exclusion of other causes of sclerokeratitis. Antituberculous drugs were given for a minimum of 6 months without concomitant use of corticosteroids. The outcome measure was resolution of the ocular surface inflammation of the sclera and cornea. Results Eight consecutive patients with a diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis were included. There were one male and seven female patients. The mean age was 29 years with an age range of 7-43 years. The involvement of the sclera was nodular in six patients and diffuse in two. The involvement of the cornea consisted of peripheral corneal stromal inflammation adjacent to the area of scleritis. Patients responded to antituberculous medications with complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without topical or systemic antiinflammatory agents. Conclusions Antituberculous medications can lead to complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without concomitant use of steroids, or other anti-inflammatory agents.

AB - Aim To study the clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis treated with antituberculous therapy without concomitant use of systemic steroids. Methods We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of eight consecutive patients with tuberculous sclerokeratitis. Patients were treated unsuccessfully with topical and/or systemic steroids. They underwent complete ophthalmic examination, systemic evaluation, laboratory investigations and imaging. Tuberculin skin test was done with purified protein derivative (PPD) on all patients. The diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis was made based on clinical findings of scleritis with adjacent peripheral corneal stromal keratitis, positive PPD test of 15 mm of induration or more, response to antituberculous treatment (ATT) within 4 weeks and exclusion of other causes of sclerokeratitis. Antituberculous drugs were given for a minimum of 6 months without concomitant use of corticosteroids. The outcome measure was resolution of the ocular surface inflammation of the sclera and cornea. Results Eight consecutive patients with a diagnosis of tuberculous sclerokeratitis were included. There were one male and seven female patients. The mean age was 29 years with an age range of 7-43 years. The involvement of the sclera was nodular in six patients and diffuse in two. The involvement of the cornea consisted of peripheral corneal stromal inflammation adjacent to the area of scleritis. Patients responded to antituberculous medications with complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without topical or systemic antiinflammatory agents. Conclusions Antituberculous medications can lead to complete resolution of the sclerokeratitis without concomitant use of steroids, or other anti-inflammatory agents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84954286620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84954286620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2015-307599

DO - 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2015-307599

M3 - Article

C2 - 26701691

AN - SCOPUS:84954286620

JO - British Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - British Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0007-1161

ER -