Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes among respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected hematologic malignancy and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving palivizumab

Nitipong Permpalung, Monica V. Mahoney, Christopher McCoy, Amporn Atsawarungruangkit, Howard S. Gold, James D. Levine, Michael T. Wong, Mary T. LaSalvia, Carolyn D. Alonso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Palivizumab has been used to treat respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected hematologic malignancy patients at our institution based on limited published data. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate clinical outcomes and mortality rates of RSV-infected hematologic malignancy patients from 2007 to 2016. A total of 67 patients (19 received palivizumab and 47 received supportive care) were identified. Palivizumab-treated patients had a significantly higher proportion of underlying ischemic heart disease, graft-versus-host-disease, hypogammaglobulinemia, and concomitant pulmonary infections. There were no significant differences in mortality rates or readmission rates between the two groups. The estimated odds ratio for death in patients receiving palivizumab after adjusting for propensity scores and covariates were 0.12 ([0.01, 1.32], p =.08) and 0.09 ([0.01, 1.03], p =.05) respectively. After adjustment for factors associated with severity of illness, there was no difference in mortality among patients treated with palivizumab.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • hematologic malignancy
  • hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • palivizumab
  • Respiratory syncytial virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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