Clinical and Psychiatric Characteristics of Self-Inflicted Burn Patients in the United States: Comparison with a Nonintentional Burn Group

Carly H. Rietschel, Jennifer Barsky Reese, Anne P. Hahn, James A. Fauerbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to examine whether self-inflicted burn patients would differ from nonintentional, nonwork related burn patients on psychiatric and personality characteristics. Sociodemographic and injury related factors were also compared. Self-inflicted (N = 15) and nonintentional (N = 178) burn patient samples were drawn from a larger study examining physical and psychosocial outcomes following major burn. Psychiatric/personality factors included self-reported psychiatric treatment history, alcohol/drug use, preburn mental health (Short Form Health Survey-12 MCS) and neuroticism (NEO five factor inventory). Sociodemographic factors and injury related factors were obtained through medical records. Comparisons between the self-inflicted and the nonintentional groups were made using Fisher's exact tests for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for continuous variables. The self-inflicted group was 11.5 times more likely to report prior psychiatric treatment relative to the nonintentional burn group (P <.001) and 4.3 times more likely to have previously abused alcohol (P =.02). Compared to nonintentional burn patients, self-inflicted burn patients reported worse preburn mental health (P <.001). There were no differences on TBSA (P =.52) or sociodemographic characteristics (P values >.08). Relative to survivors of nonintentional burns, self-inflicted burn patients in the United States demonstrate high psychiatric comorbidity. Standards of care must be developed to optimize treatment procedures and recovery outcomes in this subgroup.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-386
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical and Psychiatric Characteristics of Self-Inflicted Burn Patients in the United States: Comparison with a Nonintentional Burn Group'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this