Client and provider views on access to care for substance-using American Indians: perspectives from a Northern Plains urban clinic

Frankie Kropp, Maurine Lilleskov, Jennifer Richards, Eugene Somoza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In addition to disparities in rates of substance use problems, American Indians (AIs) report multiple barriers to receiving treatment services. The present study utilized intake questionnaire data and focus groups to gain perspectives from 152 clients (65% male, 35% female; mean age 30 years) and 6 female providers on access to treatment for Northern Plains AIs in an urban, non-Native program. AI clients acknowledged the need for treatment more often than did substance users in general, but faced greater resource barriers. Both clients and providers offered specific recommendations for improving access to substance use treatment for AI populations in the Northern Plains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-65
Number of pages23
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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North American Indians
American Indian
Therapeutics
Focus Groups
Clinic
American Indians
questionnaire
resources
Population
Group
Substance Use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Client and provider views on access to care for substance-using American Indians : perspectives from a Northern Plains urban clinic. / Kropp, Frankie; Lilleskov, Maurine; Richards, Jennifer; Somoza, Eugene.

In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2014, p. 43-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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