Cimetadine as a preoperative medication to reduce the complications of aspiration of gastric contents

Thomas Toung, John L. Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In an effort to decrease gastric residual and acid content prior to operation and thus to decrease the risk of aspiration, a prospective clinical trial comparing three drugs was carried out. Eighty-four patients undergoing elective craniotomy for a space-occupying lesion were studied. Twenty-eight patients were premedicated with the anticholinergic atropine (0.01 mg/kg); 28 patients were administered the anticholinergic glycopyrrolate (0.005 mg/kg); and 28 patients were given three preoperative doses of cimetadine and no anticholinergic. Gastric acidity was elevated above pH 2.5 in 93% of those receiving cimetadine, in comparison to 54% for glycopyrrolate and 29% with atropine. In addition, the stomach was completely dry in 54% following cimetadine, and in only 25% and 11% following glycopyrrolate and atropine. Cimetadine is more effective as a preanesthetic agent than anticholinergic drugs in decreasing gastric residual and acid content, and essentially eliminates the risk of aspiration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-208
Number of pages4
JournalSurgery
Volume87
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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