Chronicle of the Institute of Medicine physical activity recommendation: how a physical activity recommendation came to be among dietary recommendations.

George A. Brooks, Nancy F. Butte, William M. Rand, Jean Pierre Flatt, Benjamin Caballero

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Under a contract from the US Department of Health and Human Services, a multidisciplinary expert panel was appointed to review "the scientific literature regarding macronutrients and energy and develop estimates of daily intake that are compatible with good nutrition throughout the life span and that may decrease the risk of chronic disease." Within the overall context of the charge, the panel sought to quantify rates and components of daily energy expenditure in healthy adults with body mass indexes (in kg/m(2)) of 18.5-25, in growing children (in the 5th-85th percentiles of weight-for-length), and in pregnant and lactating women. The recommendation for adults became the daily energy intake necessary to cover total daily energy expenditure (TEE). For special cases, dietary macronutrients and energy to support child growth and pregnancy and lactation by women were considered. TEE was based on the results of doubly labeled water studies, and the TEE results were presented in units of physical activity level (PAL = TEE/BEE) and DeltaPAL, where BEE is the basal rate of energy expenditure extrapolated to 24 h. Most adults (66%) maintaining a BMI in the healthful range had PAL values >1.6, or the equivalent of > or =60 min of physical activity of moderate intensity each day. Hence, on the basis of the doubly labeled water data and the results of epidemiologic studies, the physical activity recommendation for adults was judged to be 60 min/d. The recommendation for children was for a minimum of 60 min/d. In conclusion, dietary and physical activity recommendations for healthful living are inextricably intertwined. Adequate physical activity provides protection against chronic diseases and helps to balance energy expenditure and intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)921S-930S
JournalThe American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume79
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronicle of the Institute of Medicine physical activity recommendation: how a physical activity recommendation came to be among dietary recommendations.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this